Home > activity > origin apex legends

origin apex legends

Time:2021-06-16 15:11:27


﹛﹛Photographer to musical stars

﹛﹛May 22, 2021

﹛﹛Daniel Coston, who has spent years as a photographer focusing on musical and entertainment stars 〞 especially those with ties to the old time and bluegrass music of this region, was on hand Tuesday for a presentation at the Historic Earle Theatre.

﹛﹛Hosted by the Mount Airy Photography Club, the presentation was attended by music enthusiasts as well as photographers.

﹛﹛Entitled ※On the Way to Here,§ Coston*s talk focused on his years photographing legendary musicians and personalities. Many photos in his presentation had never before been seen. He shared stories about surviving in the business of photography.

﹛﹛Photos the Charlotte-based photographer shared included those of Andy Griffith, Benton Flippen walking to his car, and other well-known musicians including Johnny Cash.

﹛﹛Coston has been to Mount Airy several times during his career that has focused on North Carolina musicians including several from Surry County. His extensive body of work represents many genres and a diversity of backgrounds and cultural experiences.

﹛﹛He has expressed his hope that his work will give visitors an experience and a personal connection to the music of North Carolina and celebrate musical styles from old-time, blues and jazz, to folk, rock, bluegrass and country, the music that makes up the rich heritage of Surry County and the state.

﹛﹛Coston*s exhibit, ※Carolina Calling,§ remains on display at the Historic Earle Theatre. The exhibit and the presentation are sponsored in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a Division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛Concerts set for Friday, Saturday in Mount Airy

﹛﹛May 20, 2021

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council Blackmon Amphitheatre Summer Concert Series continues this weekend with two more concerts.

﹛﹛On Friday, Souljam will be performing for concert attendees in a show that gets underway at 7:30 p.m.

﹛﹛On Saturday, the 80s band Cassette Rewind will be taking the stage at 7:30 p.m.

﹛﹛Tickets will be on sale at the gates one hour prior to the concerts. Dairy Center and Thirsty Souls Community Brewing will be on hand with concessions.

﹛﹛Those attending are encouraged to take lounge or beach chairs or a blanket. For more information, visit www.surryarts.org

﹛﹛Catalinas concert set for Friday

﹛﹛May 13, 2021

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council Blackmon Amphitheatre Summer Concert Series continues Friday night with one of the region*s more popular bands making a return to the Blackmon Amphitheatre.

﹛﹛The Catalinas will be taking the stage at 7:30 p.m. for a concert. Tickets will be on sale at the gates one hour prior to the concerts. Dairy Center and Thirsty Souls Community Brewing will be on hand with concessions.

﹛﹛Those attending are encouraged to take lounge or beach chairs or a blanket. For more information, visit www.surryarts.org

﹛﹛Photographer Coston to make presentation May 18

﹛﹛May 09, 2021

﹛﹛The Mount Airy Photography Club is hosting Charlotte-based music photographer, Daniel Coston, at the Historic Earle Theatre on Tuesday, May 18, at 7 p.m. The presentation is free and is open to the public.

﹛﹛Coston will discuss his photography career. Entitled ※On the Way to Here,§ the talk will focus on his years photographing legendary musicians and personalities. Many photos in his presentation have never before been seen. He will also be sharing stories about surviving in the business of photography.

﹛﹛Coston has been to Mount Airy several times during his career that has focused on North Carolina musicians including several from Surry County. His extensive body of work represents many genres and a diversity of backgrounds and cultural experiences. He has the hope that his work will give visitors an experience and a personal connection to the music of North Carolina and celebrate musical styles from old-time, blues and jazz, to folk, rock, bluegrass and country, the music that makes up the rich heritage of Surry County and our state.

﹛﹛Coston*s exhibit, ※Carolina Calling,§ is on display at the Historic Earle Theatre. The exhibit and the presentation are sponsored in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a Division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛The Mount Airy Photography Club is led by Kenny Hooker and Hobart Jones. Club meetings are held on the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. Anyone wishing to be on the Photography Club email list should send a request to Hobart Jones at hobartjones@icloud.com.

﹛﹛Summer concert series continues

﹛﹛May 06, 2021

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council Summer Concert Series continues this week with two concerts at the Blackmon Amphitheatre.

﹛﹛On Friday the Carolina Soul Band will take to the stage at 7:30 p.m. On Saturday, also at 7:30 p.m., the Will Jones Band will be in concert. Tickets will be on sale at the gates one hour prior to the concerts. Dairy Center and Thirsty Souls Community Brewing will be on hand with concessions.

﹛﹛Those attending are encouraged to take lounge or beach chairs or a blanket. For more information, visit www.surryarts.org

﹛﹛Summer concert series returns

﹛﹛May 02, 2021

﹛﹛Signs that summer is coming 〞 and that life is edging back toward normalcy 〞 were in full bloom Thursday evening when the first of more than 50 Surry Arts Council Summer Concert Series shows opened.

﹛﹛The series, performed at The Blackmon Amphitheatre, was forced into a year-long hiatus during 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 precautions are still in effect, with the series* opening acts doing split shows, one at 7 p.m. and another at 9 p.m., with a limited number of patrons allowed at the amphitheatre for performance.

﹛﹛On Thursday, one of the more popular bands among area residents and visitors, The Embers featuring Craig Woolard, took to the stage.

﹛﹛※The evening went well and we*re looking forward to hosting the 2021 series,§ said Tanya Jones, arts council executive director.

﹛﹛This week two more shows are slated for the Blackmon Amphitheatre, with the Carolina Soul Band set for Friday night and The Will Jones Band set to perform Saturday evening. Anyone seeking more information, or to learn about purchasing tickets, should email courtney@surryarts.org or to online to www.surryarts.org

﹛﹛Music, dance, used to mark Black History

﹛﹛April 24, 2021

﹛﹛More than 100 people turned out for the 2021 Black History Celebration held earlier this month at the Andy Griffith Playhouse.

﹛﹛The Celebration, coordinated by Marie Nicholson, Donnie Nicholson, and Maggie Hatcher of Surry Sings, featured music, poetry, dance, and stories.

﹛﹛Marie Nicholson opened the program with an introduction and purpose and gave historical highlights between bands. Adreann Belle, president of the Mount Airy Surry County Branch of the National Association of University Women, welcomed and greeted audience members.

﹛﹛Lashene Lowe, president of the African American Historic and Genealogical Society, read ※The Creation,§ a poem by James Weldon Johnson. She also gave greetings and comments on behalf of the Society. Maggie Hatcher gave some historical highlights. The C.R.E.W. Praise Dancers, youth from King*s Mountain View Progressive Primitive Baptist Church offered a Praise Dance to the song ※You Know My Name§ by Tasha Cobbs. The Chestnut Ridge Progressive Primitive Baptist Church Praise Team also entertained.

﹛﹛Instrumental and vocal groups who offered praise and song included soloist Evangelist Leslie Allen. She was followed by the New Dynamic Voices of Praise that were composed of Leslie Allen, Tabitha Brown, Brittany Flippen, Gavin Green, Pernell Wester on bass guitar, and song leader Jeremigh Brown. Elder Robert Webster accompanied the group on rhythm guitar. Also in the group were Pete Hale lead guitar, Billy Martin lead guitar, and Bernard Carter on drums. Others also participated. The Sons of Abraham played several gospel favorites. The band featured Leon Shuff on lead guitar, Bernard Carter on drums, Alton Williams and Frank Shuff vocals, along with Gerald Shuff on Bass Guitar.

﹛﹛This celebration followed the Living Rhythms Drumming workshops that were held hourly at from noon through 4 o*clock that day on the stage of the Andy Griffith Playhouse. More than 30 participants enjoyed the drumming workshops. These workshops and the celebration were free and were sponsored in part by a Grassroots grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. This grant and the programs represent a partnership between the Surry County African American Historical and Genealogical Society and the Surry Arts Council.

﹛﹛Another series of drumming workshops will be held on Saturday, May 8. All ages are invited to register and attend. Workshops are limited to 15 participants and will begin at noon and be held hourly until 4 p.m. Call the Surry Arts Council 336-786-7998 or register online at www.surryarts.org.

﹛﹛Surry Sings will resume rehearsals on Friday evening, May 7, at 6:30 p.m. on the Andy Griffith Playhouse stage. Marie Nicholson is coordinating these rehearsals. An effort is being made to have representatives from each local church in the chorus as the group prepares for a community Unity event this summer.

﹛﹛Contact Marie Nicholson mariejnic@hotmail.com with questions, to participate, or for more information.

﹛﹛Film festival participants honored

﹛﹛April 19, 2021

﹛﹛More than 40 area high-school students attended the second annual Surry Arts Film Festival at the Historic Earle Theatre on Tuesday evening, April 13.

﹛﹛Mount Airy High School had five entries under the direction of Gena Ray, choral and theatre director. Surry Central High School had one entry. &

﹛﹛The in-person event was hosted by Surry Arts Council staff including Courtney Thompson welcoming and presenting the awards, and Ken White handling projection and technical support. Courtney noted that the event is sponsored by Surry Arts Council fundraisers for school programs as well as a Grassroots Grant from the NC Arts Council, a Division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛The Best Overall award was presented to Tyler Mullins and his team for ※Birthday Boy.§ Tyler attends Mount Airy High School. The short film depicts a brother cleaning his home after an eventful birthday party. A knock at the door during the clean-up tells us more than first meets the eye.

﹛﹛※The short film was excellent on many levels ranging from directing to production and editing to the final frame,§ event organizers said.

﹛﹛The Best Documentary was awarded to Kate Deaton and her team. Kate attends Mount Airy High School. The documentary ※Pollution§ is a short film about kids entering a forest. The film shows that pollution has taken over their play space. The message that pollution is all around us and affects us in many ways is clearly shown in the film.

﹛﹛Students were encouraged to continue to express their vision and talent. Tanya Jones, Surry Arts Council Executive director, closed the show by expressing gratitude to Gena Ray, parents and students who made the event such a success. She also thanked Courtney and Ken White noting that White has probably seen more films in the past 30 years than anyone else in Surry County.

﹛﹛Students were encouraged to contact the Surry Arts Council for volunteer, theatre, and other opportunities. All those attending enjoyed popcorn and drinks.

﹛﹛For more information on school programming or movies at the Earle contact courtney@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛Art camps slated for summer

﹛﹛April 13, 2021

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council managed to offer a modified summer camp schedule last year despite the COVID-19 pandemic, and the organization will be bringing increased summer camp offerings to the community this year.

﹛﹛New programs include the ※Once Upon the Blue Ridge§ free Theatre for Young Audiences series. These shows will be held each Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at the Blackmon Amphitheatre or moved to the Andy Griffith Playhouse in the case of bad weather. The series will begin on Saturday, June 19 and run through Saturday, August 14.

﹛﹛Free old-time dance and stringed instrument lessons continue at the Historic Earle Theatre each Thursday with dance lessons at 4:30 p.m., fiddle at 5:30 p.m., and guitar, mandolin, and banjo at 6:15 p.m. This program is funded by a TAPS grant from the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. Registration is onsite prior to the beginning of each class and instruments are provided.

﹛﹛Summer camp registration is online at www.surryarts.org or parents may visit the Surry Arts Council office at 218 Rockford Street to register. New camps continue to be added. High School volunteers wishing to assist with summer camps may email courtney@surryarts.org with dates and times that they are available.

﹛﹛2021 Summer Camps include:

﹛﹛? June 7-10, Arts Alive Fiesta!, ages 3-5

﹛﹛? June 14-17, Arts Alive Fiesta!, ages 6-11

﹛﹛? June 21-July 1, Musical Theatre Ensemble, ages 8-18

﹛﹛? June 21-25, Princess Camp, ages 3 and up

﹛﹛? July 5-16, Acting Camp, ages 5-18

﹛﹛? July 12-15, Surry Strings Camp, ages 5 and up

﹛﹛? July 19-23, Dance Camp, ages 3-6

﹛﹛? July 19-23, Dance Camp, ages 7-12

﹛﹛? July 19-30, Acting Camp, ages 8-18

﹛﹛? July 19-23, Visual Arts Camp, ages 9-16

﹛﹛? July 26-30, Visual Arts Camp, ages 4-8

﹛﹛Families are encouraged to keep watch for family movies at the Historic Earle Theatre. The Surry Arts Council hopes to begin the free monthly family movie series soon.

﹛﹛Need-based scholarships are available. Email courtney@surryarts.org for an application. Funds are provided by the Kester Sink Birthday Endowment and the Dr. John L. Gravitte ※Dentistry with Heart§ Scholarship Fund. These applications may also be accessed online at www.surryarts.org or picked up at the Surry Arts Council office, 218 Rockford Street, or at Dr. Gravitte*s office, 140 N Pointe Blvd.

﹛﹛Summer concert series to get underway

﹛﹛April 11, 2021

﹛﹛After a year-long COVID-19 related hiatus, the Surry Arts Council Summer Concert Series is returning with three shows at the end of April.

﹛﹛The popular series, which features regional and national musical acts in concert at the Blackmon Amphitheatre, has more than 50 shows on the slate for this year, a welcome return to normalcy for area fans after all 52 of last year*s concerts were cancelled.

﹛﹛But there will be a few corona virus-related restrictions this year, at least during the first three shows set for April 29-May 1.

﹛﹛The Embers featuring Craig Woolard will open the 2021 Summer Series at the Blackmon Amphitheatre on Thursday, April 29, followed by Legacy Motown Revue and Cat5 on Friday and Saturday of that weekend, all operating on a modified schedule.

﹛﹛※Due to COVID restrictions and guidelines, the arts council*s choice was to cancel opening weekend or open with a modified schedule and they chose the latter,§ said the council*s Tanya Jones in a statement announcing the return of the series.

﹛﹛The modified schedule will include a 7 p.m. show and a 9 p.m. show each night during the first weekend. Patrons will choose which show they wish to attend each night. Gates for the 7 p.m. Early Show will open at 6 p.m. The Early Show audience will leave after the show ends at 8 p.m. and patrons for the 9 p.m. Late Show will be admitted.

﹛﹛※Season ticket holders will need to specify their preferred showtime in advance for the three opening weekend shows by emailing courtney@surryarts.org or calling 336-786-7998 and speaking with Lucas or Courtney,§ Jones said in the statement. Others may purchase individual tickets online at www.surryarts.org for their preferred show times at these opening weekend shows or call or go by the Surry Arts Council office. If available, tickets will also be on sale at the gates but patrons are encouraged to get tickets in advance.

﹛﹛Patrons must follow CDC guidelines that include placing their chair groups six feet apart and wearing masks except when eating or drinking. Dancing must be limited to that space as well.

﹛﹛※The number per concert will be limited and we will be following state guidelines regarding the number per concert. Children will not be admitted free on the first weekend and will be guided by the same rules as adults.§

﹛﹛Legacy Motown Revue will play on Friday, April 30, following the same schedule and guidelines, as will the CAT5 band on Saturday, May 1.

﹛﹛§The arts council had a choice of cancelling the first weekend this year or trying this schedule and hoping that the Governor opens up outdoor venues at an increased capacity so that the remaining concerts can return to the regular schedule,§ Jones said in the statement. ※The arts council requests that patrons check Facebook.com/surryartscouncil for updates. ※

﹛﹛She said many of the series* past bands are returning along with some new ones. The Dairy Center and Thirsty Souls Community Brewing will be on hand for Summer Series concerts with hot dogs, sandwiches, snacks, beer, and wine available for purchase. No outside alcohol or coolers are permitted to be brought into the Amphitheatre area. There will be no exceptions.

﹛﹛Annual passes are on sale for $125 plus tax. In addition to the Summer Series, the Annual Pass also includes admission to the weekly WPAQ Merry-Go-Round at the Historic Earle Theatre.

﹛﹛Summer Series rack cards with the season schedule are available for pick up at the Surry Arts Council, the Historic Earle Theatre, and the Andy Griffith Museum. The series may also be accessed online at www.surryarts.org. Annual Passes are available online www.surryarts.org, at the Surry Arts Council office, 218 Rockford Street, or at the gates prior to shows. Individual tickets for the Summer Series shows are $15 plus tax. Patrons are asked to have correct change as gate staff will not have coins at the gates. Again, advance purchase for the first weekend is encouraged.

﹛﹛※The arts council is excited to be opening up the series and is grateful to all patrons as we work through this together,§ she said.

﹛﹛For additional information on the Summer Series, contact Courtney Thompson at courtney@surryarts.org or call 336-786-7998.

﹛﹛Reynolds Homestead offering variety of courses

﹛﹛March 22, 2021

﹛﹛CRITZ, VA 每 Curious adults ages 50 and older who are looking for opportunities to explore history, art, fitness, and more, are invited to join the Reynolds Homestead*s College for Older Adults (COA). The spring session for COA will begin April 19 and run through May 28. This session will be a hybrid session with lectures and discussions delivered via Zoom, and fitness and art classes held outside where social distancing can be observed safely.

﹛﹛COA is a membership program that offers 32 classes for members to enjoy. Those interested in fitness can choose among Moving to Motown, a gentle aerobics class designed to keep you moving and flexible, gentle yoga, line dancing, hiking and golf.

﹛﹛History buffs can explore subjects such as the Martinsville Seven with the author of the ground-breaking book, the families and stories of Rock Castle Gorge, the Carroll County Courthouse Tragedy, and more.

﹛﹛For those who love arts and crafts, plein air painting, acrylic painting, barn quilts and wreath-making are offered. Discussions and presentations on native foods of Appalachia, protecting yourself from ticks, food prepping for emergencies, and social media for seniors are hot topics.

﹛﹛One special program offered this time is the Better Angels Workshop, Depolarizing from Within. Better Angels is a national citizens* movement to reduce political polarization in the United States by bringing liberals and conservatives together to understand each other beyond stereotypes, forming red/blue community alliances, teaching practical skills for communicating across political differences, and making a strong public argument for depolarization.

﹛﹛This session will begin with a 40-minute video, break shortly for lunch, and then resume with a ※Depolarizing Within§ workshop, with the goals of being more aware of our own ※inner polarizer,§ being critical without demonizing, dismissing or stereotyping large swaths of the population, and learning strategies for intervening constructively in social conversations with like-minded peers when these conversations veer into contempt and ridicule for people who hold other political views.

﹛﹛Interested in hobby drones? Garden photography? Kayaking? The College for Older Adults has it all.

﹛﹛Membership is $35 for the six-week session. Art classes have a small supply fee. For those who want to do the hiking only, a special price of $25 is available.

﹛﹛Registration forms are available online at www.reynoldshomestead.vt.edu or in person at the Patrick County Chamber/Creative Arts Center at 334 Patrick Avenue in Stuart.

﹛﹛Anyone with questions may contact Lisa Martin at martinlm@vt.edu. ege for Older Adults.

﹛﹛Old time musical photo exhibit on display

﹛﹛March 06, 2021

﹛﹛Carolina Calling: The Photography of Daniel Coston, which opened on Friday, Feb. 26, will run through Monday, May 31 at the Historic Earle Theatre in Mount Airy.

﹛﹛The exhibit celebrates the work of Charlotte-based music photographer Daniel Coston and the North Carolina musicians he has photographed over the past 27 years. Coston and Surry Arts Council staff have selected photos of North Carolina musicians from Coston*s extensive body of work who represent many genres, a diversity of backgrounds, and cultural experiences.

﹛﹛The exhibition is put together with the hope of creating an experience and a personal connection to the music of North Carolina for any visitor. It will also celebrate musical styles 〞 from old-time, blues and jazz, to folk, rock, bluegrass and country 〞 and how they make up the rich music heritage and culture of Surry County and North Carolina.

﹛﹛Coston will give an in-person presentation at the Earle Theatre in May. Details will be announced as soon as the state pandemic guidelines are relaxed. The exhibit is located in the Historic Earle Theatre, 142 North Main Street, Mount Airy, in the heart of downtown Mount Airy. For more information call the Surry Arts Council 336-786-7998 or email courtney@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛Tommy Jarrell winners announced

﹛﹛March 03, 2021

﹛﹛The Tommy Jarrell Youth Competition was held at the Historic Earle Theatre on Saturday, with 18 individual or ban entries, some in-person and others virtual. While travel is generally down because of COVID-19, entrants to the contest came from as far away as Roanoke, Virginia.

﹛﹛The winners were:

﹛﹛Ages 5-12

﹛﹛Fiddle

﹛﹛First place: Cheyenne Grantham from Boones Mill, Virginia

﹛﹛First place: Hunter Hiatt of State Road

﹛﹛Third place: Shawn Rippel of Pilot Mountain

﹛﹛Third place: Lily Arispe of Mount Airy

﹛﹛Clawhammer Banjo

﹛﹛First place: Wyatt Grantham of Boones Mill

﹛﹛Guitar

﹛﹛First place: Gavin Bush of Mount Airy

﹛﹛First place: Evan Bush of Mount Airy

﹛﹛Third place: Levi Arispe of Mount Airy

﹛﹛Other

﹛﹛First place: Blaine Young, of Roanoke, Virginia, Mandolin

﹛﹛First place: Grantham Band featuring Cheyenne, Wyatt and Gatlynn Grantham, of Boones Mill

﹛﹛Ages 13-18

﹛﹛Fiddle

﹛﹛First place: Victoria Blakey of Tobaccoville

﹛﹛First place: Neely Sizemore of Elkin

﹛﹛Guitar

﹛﹛First place: Darrius Flowers of Pilot Mountain

﹛﹛Dance

﹛﹛First place: Darrius Flowers, of Pilot Mountain, Flatfoot

﹛﹛First place: Candace Noah, of Dobson, Clogging

﹛﹛Bands

﹛﹛First place: Hwy 268 featuring Darrius Flowers of Pilot Mountain and Neely and Natalie Sizemore of Elkin

﹛﹛First place: Blakey Family featuring Victoria and Gabrielle Blakey and Family, of Tobaccoville

﹛﹛Other

﹛﹛First place: Ayden Young, of Roanoke, Bluegrass Banjo

﹛﹛First place: Candace Noah, of Dobson, Bluegrass Banjo

﹛﹛Third place: Natalie Sizemore, of Elkin, Mandolin

﹛﹛Arts Ball online auction underway

﹛﹛February 19, 2021

﹛﹛It*s beginning to sound like a broken record (for those who remember records) 〞 another event cancelled because of COVID-19.

﹛﹛That is the case with the annual Arts Ball gathering, which would have been held Friday night under normal circumstances. The Arts Ball, sponsored by the Surry Arts Council, is the annual soiree held at Cross Creek Country Club. While the gathering generally has a different theme each year, it includes food, music, and a popular auction of various goods and services 〞 with the proceeds going to support numerous in-school arts programs held throughout Surry County.

﹛﹛While the soiree part may no happen, the arts council*s auction is going on now, featuring more than 300 items that range from gift cards to hand-crafted furniture items to home baked goodies for the purchaser prepared at a mutually agreeable time. There*s even a few overnight stays at some area resorts.

﹛﹛All to support various art projects benefitting area school children.

﹛﹛Melissa Sumner, Surry Arts Council events and school programs coordinator, said she is overwhelmed by the response from schools and the community, and that the community and schools ※were more generous than ever with donations that everyone will want.§

﹛﹛Some of the specific items up for grabs in the auction include overnights at a Kibbler Valley home with a trout stream, two nights at the River House Inn and Restaurant with breakfast and dinner for one, overnight stays at a private home in Pinehurst, handcrafted Adirondack chairs, a fire pit, massage gift cards, a family pass to the zoo, passes to the Greensboro Science Center, an electric tooth brush in a gift basket, jewelry, a private wine class, socks, a custom made trestle table by Joey Martin, and many more great options.

﹛﹛The auction went live Friday, Feb. 19, at 9 a.m. the day the Arts Ball was planned, and the auction will run through March 1.

﹛﹛All of the funds raised will be used to support 2021-2022 arts programming in the Surry County Schools, Millennium Charter Academy, and the Mount Airy City Schools.

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council and area schools are grateful to Rogers Realty and Auction for hosting the online auction. Everyone is invited to participate by going online www.rogersauctiongroup.com and registering. The minimum bid for each item is $5. Gift cards will be mailed to the successful bidders. Other items can be picked up at the Surry Arts Council offices following the auction closure. Sumner will work with those purchasing larger items on mutually agreeable pick-up times during the week following the close of the auction on March 1.

﹛﹛※Dozens of volunteers and school personnel worked hard on the silent auction,§ the arts council said in announcing the auction. ※Melissa Sumner thanked the volunteer committee for their hard work during this logistically challenging time. The committee met via Zoom and early in the process made the decision that an in-person gathering would not be safe.§

﹛﹛That left the group working with schools to coordinate the online event. All 25 schools participated with both donations and support. Surry Arts Council board members, school personnel, and dozens of volunteers worked to ensure ※that the arts remain a part of our area school programming,§ the council said.

﹛﹛Committee members included Surry County Schools staff Tracey Lewis, Gaye Cooke, Lisa Parrish, Hollie Lyons, Antonia Cawley and Jessica McLeod. Millennium Charter Academy efforts were led by T.J. Lievsay, and Mount Airy City School coordination was overseen by Carrie Venable. Surry Arts Council Board Members and spouses assisting including Brooke Lowry, Meredith Simmons, Ashley Mills, Jennifer Nester, Ginny and Cooper Adams, and Nicole Harrison. Jenny Lowry was added support to the effort along with many others downtown and in local and regional businesses.

﹛﹛In addition to directly paying for arts programs, the Arts Ball proceeds leverage grants from the North Carolina Arts Council and South Arts. The TAPS grant provides support for several hundred students to have a hands-on experience with traditional stringed instruments. Jim Vipperman spends a week in each of three schools introducing students to fiddles, guitars, and Surry County*s traditional music heritage. Students are then able to attend the weekly free year-round lessons at the Historic Earle Theatre every Thursday afternoon if they wish to continue free lessons.

﹛﹛There have been limits during the current school year but the arts council has collaborated with Mount Airy City Schools and the Reeves Community Center Foundation on the ELISS grant to provide in-person arts programming while following CDC guidelines. The Arts Council staff took dozens of craft kits, gingercookie kits, and other materials to special education classes in the schools.

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council has a grant from South Arts to provide programming with Sons of Mystro concerts in the school and in the community as soon as guidelines permit. In addition, Mike Wiley is scheduled for multiple Black History programs in the schools as soon as in-person engagements are safe.

﹛﹛The arts council is working with school officials and will host the second Surry High School Film Festival. The winning entries from each high school will be shown at the Historic Earle Theatre on Tuesday evening, April 7, for contestants, friends, and family. The Surry Arts Council has worked with the schools and continued to host interns during the current school year.

﹛﹛Arts programs funded by the Arts Ball facilitate more than 15,000 student contacts annually. It is the Surry Arts Council*s goal to send at least one program to each school in the Surry County School system, the Mount Airy City School system, and Millennium Charter Academy, the organization said. Most schools receive two or three programs. Students in these 25 schools are also invited to one or more programs at the Andy Griffith Playhouse, the Historic Earle Theatre, and/or the Blackmon Amphitheatre. Students visit and have guided tours at the Andy Griffith Museum, the Andy Griffith Playhouse, the Old-Time Music Heritage Hall, and the Siamese Twins Exhibit at no cost. School concerts and drama presentations are hosted by the Surry Arts Council throughout the year at no cost to the schools.

﹛﹛The arts council works with schools to host interns and to provide art instruction in both in-school and after school programs along with many other partnerships throughout the year. In addition, scholarships from the Jimmy Lowry Endowment, the Betty Lynn Endowment, the Mildred Robertson Endowment, and the Sandy Beam Endowment provide scholarships to Surry County students who wish to further their education in the arts.

﹛﹛All of these programs are supported by the annual Charity Ball auction.

﹛﹛Early College student artwork advances

﹛﹛February 18, 2021

﹛﹛Surry Early College High School student Elorah Gillispie recently competed in the Regional NCASA Art Showcase Competition. Elorah entered a digital media piece of artwork titled ※Changing History,§ and will move on to take part in the state competition this spring.

﹛﹛Art Showcase is a competition that recognizes both the best individual artists and best art programs in North Carolina schools. Students are presented with a prompt and given about one month to create their submission. Media categories include painting, drawing, collage, photography, and other creative efforts. Electronic copies of submissions are sent to NCASA and forwarded to judges. Submissions from top teams and students from each category advance to the state finals and are evaluated by judges in a live exhibition.

﹛﹛Surry Central art team advances

﹛﹛February 17, 2021

﹛﹛The Surry Central High School art competition team placed second in the Western Region behind Myers Park High School of Charlotteduring a recently competition.

﹛﹛Individually, Joy Tilley*s Collage of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Adora Dudley*s Lino-cut Print for Equality both placed first in their respective divisions. Emma Cooke*s Computer-Generated BLM Police Officer tied for first with Surry Early College.

﹛﹛Laken Creed*s Painting for Mental Health Issues placed second in her division, and Delia Chavez Sculpture of The Fabric of Society placed fourth.

﹛﹛While not everyone placed in their category, each entry helps build the team score and the team will move on to the state finals. Students will prepare an artist statement that explains their choices and continue competing against 10 other high schools.

﹛﹛The team members are Joy Tilley, Adora Dudley, Emma Cooke, Laken Creed, Delia Chavez, Lanie Fitzgerald, Josh Marion, and Yadira Branch.

﹛﹛Tommy Jarrell Festival to open Feb. 25

﹛﹛February 17, 2021

﹛﹛As is the case with seemingly everything else, the organizers of the annual Tommy Jarrell Birthday celebration have been forced to cut back just a bit this year as a result of COVID-19 restrictions.

﹛﹛But the annual event, along with a popular youth competition, will go on, even if some of it is in the virtual world.

﹛﹛The yearly gathering 〞 which celebrates the music and teachings of Surry County native and blue grass and old time music pioneer Tommy Jarrell, will kick off on Feb. 25 with the opening of photographer Daniel Coston*s show ※Carolina Calling§ featuring North Carolina musicians.

﹛﹛※The photo show will be opening during the Tommy Jarrell weekend but there will be no official ribbon cutting or opening due to the pandemic,§ said Tanya Jones, executive director of the Surry Arts Council, which oversees the festival.

﹛﹛※This, like all events we have hosted since March 2020, is significantly scaled back with no birthday concert and dance and without the in-person old-time classes,§ she said.

﹛﹛As a result, she said that Coston will present a free workshop at a later date ※when guidelines hopefully permit an in-person event where he will be hosting both a presentation and workshop as well as selling and autographing his books,§ she said.

﹛﹛Coston*s show is sponsored by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources in partnership with the Mount Airy Photography Club. The show will be at the Earle through May 2021.

﹛﹛※He has lived in Charlotte since 1983 and his work has been featured in many major publications, on television, in documentaries, and in various exhibitions,§ the arts council said in announcing the show. ※Coston has worked with artists including the Avett Brothers, Johnny Cash, Marice Williams, Carolina Chocolate Drops, and many more.§

﹛﹛In addition to his work capturing visual music moments, he has authored several books including North Carolina Musicians: Photographs and Conversations; There Was a Time: Rock and Roll During the 1960*s in Charlotte North Carolina; and Home of the Blues: A History of the Double Door Inn. Coston*s Exhibit ※Carolina Calling§ showcases his documentation of North Carolina music. Coston is amazed at the diversity of the music in NC. ※Every musical genre we know would not be the same without musicians from North Carolina, blues, jazz, bluegrass, all the way through to Rock & Roll and Hip Hop.§

﹛﹛The show opened at the Earl Scruggs Museum in Shelby last year. Coston has added several local musicians that he photographed to the Mount Airy show. These include Andy Griffith, Benton Flippen, and Donna Fargo.

﹛﹛On the same day, Darius Flowers will lead the weekly free old-time dance workshop at 4:30 p.m. Youth fiddle and guitar lessons led by Brown-Hudson award-winning teacher Jim Vipperman will follow the dance class.

﹛﹛On Friday and Saturday, Feb. 26 and Feb. 27, award winning old-time musicians Martha Spencer and Emily Spencer will teach fiddle, guitar, banjo, and mandolin workshops online.

﹛﹛Interested participants are encouraged to go online at www.surryarts.org and register for the classes. Emily and Martha Spencer have enjoyed a lifetime of preserving the old-time music, dance, and vocal traditions of the Appalachians.

﹛﹛※It*s music that is authentic and real for Martha who grew up in the musical Spencer family, singing and flatfoot dancing by the time she could walk. She has known and loved music all her life and has mastered instruments including the guitar, banjo, fiddle, bass, mandolin and dulcimer.§ the arts council said.

﹛﹛The Tommy Jarrell Youth Competition will be held at the Historic Earle Theatre at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 27. The competition welcomes youth through the age of 18. Each competitor has three minutes to perform. Virtual entries will be accepted this year and should be emailed to courtney@surryarts.org by Thursday, Feb. 25 at 5 p.m. The winners will be announced and trophies will be presented following the competition on Saturday.

﹛﹛For more information, contact the Surry Arts Council at 336-786-7998 or courtney@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛Series of drum classes set

﹛﹛January 09, 2021

﹛﹛In celebration of Black History Month, the African American Historical and Genealogical Society with a grant from the Grassroots Program of the North Carolina Arts Council is partnering with the Surry Arts Council to host drumming workshops on the stage of the Andy Griffith Playhouse.

﹛﹛The workshops will be held on Saturday, Feb. 13, March 13, April 10, and May 8. Three workshops will be hosted each day at 1, 2, and 3 p.m. at the Andy Griffith Playhouse, at 218 Rockford Street. The workshops are free but advance registration is required by calling 336-786-7998 or going to www.surryarts.org. Each class is limited to 10 participants. To remain in compliance with CDC guidelines masks are required, drums will be sanitized between classes and are distanced. Drums are provided for each participant. All ages are encouraged to register.

﹛﹛Living Rhythms exposes participants to the music of Africa with the aim to broaden understanding of an increasingly interdependent world and to encourage the embracing of cultural diversity. The joy and community spirit inherent in drumming gives participants direct access to the concepts of tolerance, harmony, and responsible world citizenship.

﹛﹛For more information or to register, contact Courtney Thompson at 336-786-7998 or via email courtney@surryarts.org or email Marie Nicholson mariejnic@hotmail.com.

﹛﹛These free programs are sponsored in part by the African American Historical and Genealogical Society and a grant from the Grassroots Program of the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, in partnership with the Surry Arts Council. Nicholson wrote the subgrant application for these programs on behalf of the African American Historical and Geneological Society, with the effort garnering a $3,000 grant for the program.

﹛﹛November 03, 2020

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council is accepting applications for North Carolina CARES for Arts Subgrants through Nov. 9, and applications for the North Carolina Arts Council Grassroots Arts Program Subgrants through Nov. 30.

﹛﹛The North Carolina General Assembly designated $9.4 million federal CARES Act funds for arts councils and arts organizations to mitigate business disruptions caused by COVID-19. The North Carolina Arts Council will distribute these funds on a per-capita basis to all North Carolina counties with a population of less than one million people. The Surry Arts Council is receiving the funds and will sub-grant a portion of the county allotment to eligible recipients in Surry County.

﹛﹛Arts Councils and Arts Organizations are eligible to apply for a North Carolina CARES for Arts Subgrant to offset business expenses incurred due to COVID-19 between March 1 and Dec, 30. The following expenses can be considered: paid salaries and benefits, on-going operating expenses, costs associated with canceling programs and creating virtual programs, and COVID-related safety and cleaning measures. Subgrant applicants must provide documentation as evidence for expenses and these documents must include receipts, invoices, monthly financial statements, and payroll ledgers.

﹛﹛North Carolina CARES for Arts funding cannot reimburse expenses already paid by other federal relief funds such as PPP loans, direct grants from the NEA, and stimulus grants issued by the North Carolina Arts Council. Application forms and grant guidelines are available on the Surry Arts Council website at www.surryarts.org. Applications including supporting documentation must be received in the Surry Arts Council office no later than 5 p.m. on Nov. 9.

﹛﹛The annual North Carolina Arts Council Grassroots Arts Program Subgrants are open to Surry County nonprofit and arts organizations who present arts programming. These applications are available on www.ncarts.org and www.surryarts.org. These applications are due in the Surry Arts Council office no later than 5 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 30. For questions about either of these subgrant applications email tanya@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛Merry-Go-Round returns to Earle on Saturday

﹛﹛October 18, 2020

﹛﹛A decades-long fixture in the Mount Airy and greater old-time music world soon will be returning after a COVID-19 hiatus.

﹛﹛WPAQ*s long-standing Merry-Go-Round live radio broadcast will return to the Historic Earle Theatre on Saturday, Oct. 24, with several performances, beginning at 11 a.m.

﹛﹛The performers at 11 a.m. are Surry Arts Council Ukulele Retreat musicians led by George Smith. Once the ukulele musicians are finished, The Java Brothers will take to the stage to entertain, from noon until 1:30 p.m.

﹛﹛A week later, on Halloween, the Merry-Go-Round will feature The Goodfellers at 11 a.m. and Flint Ridge from noon until 1:30 p.m.

﹛﹛※It will be great to get back live on the stage at the Earle with these favorite bluegrass and bluegrass/gospel bands,§ said Jennie Lowry, a weekly host of the WPAQ Merry-Go-Round.

﹛﹛According to Tanya Jones, Surry Arts Council executive director, WPAQ and the Surry Arts Council are working together to safely and slowly reopen this popular weekly live broadcast. Masks and social distancing will be required and attendance will be limited to remain in compliance with state guidelines.

﹛﹛WPAQ Merry-Go-Round is the second-longest continuously running live radio broadcast in the nation, second only to the Grand Ole Opry. COVID-19 closed down the public performances earlier this year, and the Merry-Go-Round had to broadcast from the WPAQ Studio.

﹛﹛Admission to the Merry-Go-Round is $8 and can be purchased at the door. Admission to the Merry-Go-Round also includes admission to the Andy Griffith Museum at 218 Rockford Street and the Siamese Twins Exhibit.

﹛﹛Anyone holding a 2020 Surry Arts Council Annual Pass or Merry-Go-Round Annual Pass can use those for admission through Dec. 31. The weekly show runs from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. each Saturday.

﹛﹛For additional information, www.surryarts.org or www.WPAQ740.com

﹛﹛Ukulele workshop set for Oct. 23-Oct.25

﹛﹛October 14, 2020

﹛﹛After a successful debut in 2019, the annual Surry Arts Council Ukulele Retreat is scheduled to return this fall for area ukulele musicians and enthusiasts.

﹛﹛The retreat is scheduled for Oct. 23-25. Retreat attendance, however, is limited this year so that the Surry Arts Council can comply with state-issued guidelines regarding social distancing.

﹛﹛George Smith, a well-known ukulele player and musician will again host the event this year. He has played with numerous bands and has opened for acts including Lynyrd Skynyrd, Marshall Tucker Band, and Drive By Truckers, to name a few. Classes will be held at the Historic Earle Theatre and the Andy Griffith Playhouse. The class schedule for the retreat and class descriptions is:

﹛﹛Friday, Oct. 23

﹛﹛12:30 p.m. Registration at Historic Earle Theatre

﹛﹛1 p.m. Circle Jam and Introductions at the Earle Theatre

﹛﹛2 -2:15 p.m. Break

﹛﹛2:15-3:30 p.m. Movable Chords, at the Earle. Comfortable hand positions and thinking ahead will help players glide from chord to chord with ease. Are there any chords you find particularly challenging? Bring them to class. If they*re challenging for you, they*re challenging for everyone..

﹛﹛3:30-3:45 p.m. Break

﹛﹛3:45-5:00 p.m. Uke Pop Rock at the Earle. Learn several songs that are pop rock favorites. The instructor will provide a few song sheets to inspire the group!

﹛﹛5-7 p.m. Dinner on your own

﹛﹛7 p.m.-8 p.m. Improvising Solos, at the Andy Griffith Playhouse. This class will examine how to make up solos as you go in many genres of pop, folk and rock music. We will look at the importance of melody, embellishments and dynamics to execute emotions on the fly. Sometimes you only need a few notes and some soul!

﹛﹛Saturday, Oct. 24

﹛﹛9:30-10:30 a.m. Rehearse for a performance on the Merry-Go-Round, at the Earle

﹛﹛10:30-10:45 a.m. Break

﹛﹛10:45-11:00 a.m. Sound check on the stage at the Earle Theatre

﹛﹛11 a.m. -12 p.m. Perform live on the Merry-Go-Round at the Earle

﹛﹛12 p.m.-1:45 p.m. Lunch on your own

﹛﹛1:45-3 p.m. Songwriting, held at the Andy Griffith Playhouse. Explore how to write your own songs. This class will explore elements of song writing that includes: lyrics, melodies and chords.

﹛﹛3-3:15 p.m. Break

﹛﹛3:15-4:45 p.m. Slide Uke, held at the Andy Griffith Playhouse. Have fun playing slide ukulele. This class will begin with some basic slide techniques; choosing a slide and applying it to some basic blues. We will look at a couple of open tunings as well as playing in standard. More advanced soloing techniques will also be addressed, such as playing in the style of the Allman Brothers.

﹛﹛5-7 p.m. Dinner on your own

﹛﹛7-8 p.m. Jam session at the Andy Griffith Playhouse

﹛﹛Sunday, Oct. 25

﹛﹛11 a.m.-12 p.m. Holiday Ukulele at the Earle. Get a jumpstart on learning holiday favorites. This class will allow students to build their holiday repertoire.

﹛﹛2 p.m. Instructor Performance at the Andy Griffith Playhouse.

﹛﹛Register at www.surryarts.org or call 336-786-7998 for more information.

﹛﹛Movies, music and dance restarting at Earle

﹛﹛October 10, 2020

﹛﹛The Historic Earle Theatre is reopening later this month for several activities 〞 including movie showings and free Traditional Arts Programs for Students (TAPS) lessons for young musicians and dancers.

﹛﹛Movies, for the viewing public, will begin Oct. 24, while the TAPS music and dance lessons will get underway Thursday.

﹛﹛The TAPS lessons also will resume on Thursday. Traditional dance is at 4:30 p.m., followed by fiddle at 5:30 p.m. and banjo, guitar, and mandolin at 6:15 p.m.

﹛﹛Jim Vipperman, multi award-winning musician and teacher, instructs the music lessons. Instruments are provided and students are encouraged to try out different instruments. No experience is needed, and the instructors provide tablature. Students are given the opportunity to play alone and in groups on the Earle stage. Masks are required and will be provided if needed.

﹛﹛TAPS students often compete in youth competitions and they are encouraged and assisted in working on competition pieces during class. In the past, TAPS students have competed at the Tommy Jarrell Youth Competition and the Mount Airy Fiddlers Convention, among others. Most recently, TAPS students competed in the Mayberry Idle competition during Mayberry Days and won second place, giving them the opportunity to perform live at Colonel Tim*s Talent Time before an audience of local residents and visitors.

﹛﹛Dance is instructed by award-winning dancer and instrumentalist Darius Flowers along with Shelby Coleman, Surry Arts Council dance director.

﹛﹛The lessons are supported by a TAPS grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. The grant provides communities with funding for after-school programs that connect North Carolina students with local traditional artists. Students receive instruction in an art form that has deep cultural roots in their community. Advance registration for TAPS classes is not required.

﹛﹛Movies at the Historic Earle Theatre are scheduled to start on Friday, Oct. 24, at 7 p.m. with the 96-minute Disney family comedy Hocus Pocus. The movie stars Bette Midler, Kathy Najimy and Sarah Jessica Parker with Omri Katz, Thora Birch and Vinessa Shaw in supporting roles. Show times will be that Friday at 7 p.m., then Saturday at 2 p.m., 4 p.m., and 7 p.m. and at those same times on that Sunday.

﹛﹛On Oct. 30, Disney/Pixar*s Coco will be featured. Miguel, an aspiring young musician, embarks on a journey to the land of his ancestors. There, the trickster Hector becomes an unexpected friend who helps Miguel uncover the mysteries behind his family*s stories and traditions. Showtimes will be Friday, Oct. 30, at 7 p.m., that Saturday (Halloween) at 2, 4, and 7 p.m., and that Sunday, at 2, 4, and 7 p.m. On Halloween, the first 10 customers at each show will receive free popcorn.

﹛﹛Masks will be required and the limited number of guests will be asked to socially distance in pre-marked seats.

﹛﹛Mickey Galyean & Cullens Bridge concert set

﹛﹛October 09, 2020

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council will restart the Blue Ridge and Beyond Series with Rebel Records recording artist Mickey Galyean and Cullen*s Bridge on Saturday, Oct. 17, with a concert at 7:30 pm at the Historic Earle Theatre.

﹛﹛As with all North Carolina events, masks will be required, social distancing will be observed, and attendance will be limited but Surry Arts Council officials, artists, and fans are excited to safely reopen.

﹛﹛Mickey Galyean and Cullen*s Bridge plays bluegrass music in a style established by regional bands such as Cullen Galyean and the Stanley Brothers, in addition to creating their own original music rooted in these traditions. Galyean is the son of legendary five-string banjo player Cullen Galyean, formerly of greatly respected regional groups the Foot Hill Boys and the Border Mountain Boys.

﹛﹛After the passing of his father, Cullen Galyean, in 2010, Mickey Galyean felt a strong desire to keep the music of his father alive. His father left a deep musical legacy in the region, including a long list of traditional mountain bluegrass songs that have been become part of the bluegrass cannon. The band makes an intentional effort to honor the music and the people from the region who developed the style.

﹛﹛Mickey Galyean grew up in Surry County playing all kinds of music, from rock-n-roll to country gospel. Galyean eventually turned his attention to traditional bluegrass music, playing guitar and singing lead with Rich In Tradition before helping start Mickey Galyean and Cullen*s Bridge.

﹛﹛Brad Hiatt grew up in a musical household, with banjos, fiddle, guitars, and mandolins commonplace around the home. Brad was also part of the Rich In Tradition band before helping start Cullen*s Bridge. He plays an old Kay bass that used to belong to Cousin Jake of the Foggy Mountain Boys. He also writes songs and sings lead and bass baritone harmony parts in the band.

﹛﹛Rick Pardue has been playing bluegrass music for more than 50 years. Pardue is known for his excellent bluegrass banjo playing, and over the years he has picked with many artists and bands including Roy McMillan, Sugarloaf Ramblers, Long & Pardue, and Carolina Road. He is also a songwriter, and the recipient of the 2012 International Bluegrass Music Association ※Song of the Year§ award. Pardue sings tenor harmonies.

﹛﹛Billy Hawks, from Dobson, started traveling on the road at age 15, playing in a bluegrass gospel band. He spent several years competing in conventions around the region and country, including winning the prestigious Galax bluegrass fiddle competition. He toured with Big Country Bluegrass for six years before joining Junior Sisk and Ramblers Choice, touring around the country and Canada. He plays fiddle and harmonizes with bass vocals.

﹛﹛Tickets for the concert may be purchased in advance on www.surryarts.org or at the door if tickets remain. Seating will be first come-first served with social distancing enforced. Call 336-786-7998 or email courtney@surryarts.org for more information on purchasing tickets.

﹛﹛Surry Arts Council holding painting classes

﹛﹛September 03, 2020

﹛﹛Artists of all ages and all skill levels are welcome at the Surry Arts Council painting and art classes where Artistic and Visual Arts Director Madeline Matanick instructs a variety of classes.

﹛﹛Monthly classes are $30 per month and meet in the Surry Arts Council Art Studio, a newly dedicated space just for art classes. The revamped space offers privacy and allows for distancing while maintaining ample work space.

﹛﹛? Adults who are interested in exploring their personal painting style with one-on-one instruction in a relaxed, fun, supportive environment meet Mondays at 1 p.m.

﹛﹛? Painting for Teens is Mondays at 4 p.m. The classes dive into the basics of drawing and painting, focusing on perspective, color and composition.

﹛﹛? Kids ages 5-9 have Kids Art Class on Tuesdays at 4 p.m. From finger painting to portraiture, classes will explore the world of art while learning about shape, composition, and color. Each student will complete a work every class.

﹛﹛? New on the schedule are Paint Parties at the arts council. Paint Parties, costing $30, feature lightly traced canvases, step-by-step instructions, and all materials included. Join Matanick in the Art Room on Thursday, Sept. 10, at 6:30 p.m. to paint ※Fine and Sandy.§

﹛﹛? During Mayberry Days there are several Mayberry Paints events at a cost of $20. Betty Lynn*s ※She*s the Cats!§ is offered three times: Thursday, Friday, or Saturday, Sept. 24-26 at 2 p.m. in the Art Room. A video Lynn recorded talking about her visual arts career will play during the class and participants will be painting a Betty Lynn design. Participants can customize their colors.

﹛﹛? Additional Mayberry Paints events are: ※Pies and Pickles§ on Monday, Sept. 21, or Friday, Sept. 25; ※Mayberry Patrol§ done on Tuesday, Sept. 22, or Saturday, Sept. 26; ※It*s a Big Moulage§ on Wednesday, Sept. 23; and ※Gone Fishin*§ on Thursday, Sept. 24. All are at 11 a.m. in the Art Room.

﹛﹛? Brews and Brushes, costing $30, returns to Thirsty Souls Community Brewing at 238 Market Street on Wednesday, Sept. 30, at 6 p.m. The group will be painting ※Herbie*s Gal.§

﹛﹛To register visit the Surry Arts Council Facebook page. For additional information or any questions, contact Matanick at madi@surryarts.org or 336-786-7998.

﹛﹛Artists, friends join to open market

﹛﹛August 05, 2020

﹛﹛A Pilot Mountain potter and businesswoman is using her creativity and passion for the arts to bring together an assemblage of talented area artists and craftspersons, developing a market for art lovers of all kinds.

﹛﹛Kathy George honed her skills as a potter while studying under well-known pottery maker and teacher Sylvia Lawson. George is a cosmetologist by trade and has owned and operated of The Head Shoppe Plus in Pilot Mountain for more than 40 years.

﹛﹛At her business and in her classes, George had developed a network of friends who appreciate a variety of art. They had often reminisced about the art market which once operated in downtown Pilot Mountain and lamented its closing. George began to wonder if, with the help of friends, she could revive the art market concept.

﹛﹛Sylvia Lawson joined in the idea and the friends began to make plans, welcoming enthusiastic input from other artists. A third local potter and pottery teacher, Joel Jessup, also volunteered his time and skills to the project.

﹛﹛When a pottery friend of Lawson*s passed away, she and George purchased an assortment of equipment in order to establish a studio in a large space at 703 West Main Street in Pilot Mountain. George*s salon is located at 701 West Main Street.

﹛﹛The space soon proved ideal for established artists to come in to work and offer classes, while also displaying some pieces. The growing venture was dubbed the West End Arts Market.

﹛﹛※It*s a place to learn,§ Lawson said. ※It*s a place where artists can not only teach but show off their own quality work. And right now, when we don*t have festivals and shows, it*s an outlet for them.§

﹛﹛※It*s been so much fun working with Kathy to set this up and get it started,§ Lawson noted. ※We*ve been a sounding board for each other and we work well together.§

﹛﹛※Several of our artists have taken classes under Sylvia,§ George said. ※She has been so generous with her time and knowledge.§

﹛﹛George also voiced appreciation to her husband, Lynn Templeton, without whom, she said, ※these things wouldn*t be possible.§

﹛﹛※Kathy has accumulated so much art and developed a real love of art over the years,§ Jessup said. ※She has a vision and appreciation for so many different genres. It*s so good to be able to come here and talk to other artists, to learn from them and to grow an appreciation for what they do.§

﹛﹛According to George, the studio started out as a place for potters to gather, sharing ideas and an appreciation for the creativity being displayed. But soon artists began to talk with their friends and the collection of artists grew and became more diverse.

﹛﹛Classes are now being offered for instruction in various forms of art. An effort has been made that when not having classes, however, studio displays will be limited to established local artists.

﹛﹛Gradually, the concept has outgrown the studio and George has now dedicated a significant portion of her salon to the display and potential sale of finished pieces.

﹛﹛Work is also on display in the studio, which opens to the public from 11-2 on the first Saturday of each month for a time known simply as ※First Saturday Arts.§ For the studio*s initial event, a meet-the-artists day was held with numerous participating artists in attendance.

﹛﹛※And there may be artists on hand working on a First Saturday,§ George noted. ※We never know in advance who*ll be here or who*ll be coming by.§

﹛﹛A large assortment of pieces in the space made available at the salon will be available during normal salon hours each Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

﹛﹛Artists taking part in the studio include potters George, Lawson and Jessup as well as Shirley Peele (inspirational rock painting), Ginny Adams (pottery and garden-themed skills), Tommy Cheek (stained glass), the husband and wife team of David (pottery) and Arlene Johnson (painting), Ellen Peric (soaps), Debbie Lyons (pottery), Pamela S. Buchanan (Kudzu art), Jill Boyes (pottery and quilting), Randy Keirl (woodworking) and Marion Nunn (embroidery). Other artists are expected to be added as word of the venture spreads.

﹛﹛※I allow them to display for a small percentage,§ George said, ※but for me, it*s a labor of love. This is my baby.§

﹛﹛※This is good for all of us and for Pilot Mountain,§ she continued. ※We have some priceless talent here. These are artists whose creativity pours out through their work. This provides them with the outlet they need and deserve.§

﹛﹛Sons of Mystro to perform in Mount Airy

﹛﹛August 01, 2020

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council received a grant from South Arts to host the Sons of Mystro for two performances in the spring of 2021. A daytime performance will target middle and high school students, and an evening performance will be open to the public.

﹛﹛Born in South Florida to a Jamaican father and Barbadian mother, Malcolm, 23, and his 20-year old brother, Umoja, learned to play violin through South Florida*s public school system. They attended Dillard High School for the Performing Arts. Together, these brothers are Sons of Mystro. This pair of violin virtuosos use their violins to interpret reggae classics, American pop songs, and their own creations accompanied by a DJ and a drummer.

﹛﹛Their music journey began when Malcolm was enrolled at Bethune Elementary, a magnet school located in Hollywood, Florida. He gained interest in music at that time but was pushed toward the violin by his third grade teacher. She told him ※if you play the violin in my class, you can go to Disney World,§ Malcolm said. After he took up the violin, Umoja wanted to follow in his older brother*s footsteps and took up the violin as well. Their father realized the duo*s talent when they played in Umoja*s middle school talent show.

﹛﹛Their dad was DJ Mystro in his early years, thus the Sons of Mystro name was chosen to carry on the family legacy. They have played for many events and with many well-known musicians but their most surreal experiences are collaborating with Black Violin, an American hip-hop group that primarily plays the violin as well. Black Violin played in Mount Airy for area schools several years ago. Black Violin was a major influence on this group from its beginnings. Those who hear them say their violins sing in many genres.

﹛﹛Sons of Mystro are the winners of the Emerging Artist under 21 Years Old award at International Reggae and World Music Awards. Their debut recording, ※Reggae Strings§ is available. ※These artists are stars on the rise. Our proteges, Sons of Mystro, are an innovative musical force that is ready to take the world by storm,§ says their mentors, Black Violin.

﹛﹛These performances are sponsored in part by a grant from South Arts. South Arts is funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts as well as other public and private sources.

﹛﹛July 28, 2020

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council has received a $10,000 NC CARES: Humanities Relief Grant from the North Carolina Humanities Council. This emergency grant funding was provided to North Carolina cultural organizations experiencing hardships due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

﹛﹛※We are grateful to be one of 59 organizations the North Carolina Humanities Council selected for this funding,§ said Tanya Jones, Surry Arts Council executive director. The Surry Arts Council has suffered unprecedented financial losses since March and did not reach its fund drive goal for the first time since 2008, the agency said in a written statement announcing the grant. Hundreds of thousands of dollars in revenue have been lost, most of the programming remains at a standstill with no concerts, community theater, movies, and more.

﹛﹛※This important funding will help support operating expenses for the next few months as we continue to reassess ongoing programming and offerings in light of the pandemic,§ the council said in the statement. ※The arts council is in the process of repurposing spaces and will soon begin to offer new options for small groups of locals and visitors with this new funding that will focus on sharing our cultural assets. The Surry Arts Council recently cut back staffing for the second time since March and this funding comes at a crucial time.§

﹛﹛NC CARES: Humanities Relief Grant funding was provided to the North Carolina Humanities Council by the National Endowment for the Humanities through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act passed by Congress in March. The $2.2 trillion CARES package included $75 million for the National Endowment for the Humanities, nearly $30 million, or a total of 40%, of which was sent to the 56 state and jurisdictional humanities councils, including the North Carolina Humanities Council, to distribute to local cultural nonprofits and programming. The North Carolina Humanities Council www.nchumanities.org is a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

﹛﹛For more information about Surry Arts Council visit www.surryart.org.

﹛﹛July 11, 2020

﹛﹛Artists in all disciplines are eligible to apply for grants to support their professional and artistic development through a partnership of the North Carolina Arts Council, Caswell Council for the Arts, Rockingham County Arts Council, Surry Arts Council, Stokes County Arts Council, and Yadkin Arts Council.

﹛﹛Artist Support Grants will be distributed to eligible applicants by the Yadkin Arts Council in Surry, Caswell, Rockingham, Stokes and Yadkin counties.

﹛﹛Applications for the grants are available online at https://www.yadkinarts.org/artist-support-grant/. The deadline is Sept. 30. Grants will range in awards from $500 to $1,200.

﹛﹛Emerging or established artists are encouraged to apply to support a range of professional and artistic development including the creation of work, improvement of business operations, or expanding capacity to bring work to new audiences. Artist fees are also allowable expenses. Artists in all disciplines are eligible to apply.

﹛﹛※The Artist Support Grants program responds to the impact of the pandemic by ensuring that artists and the state*s arts infrastructure have the resources needed to help our state make a strong social and economic recovery,§ said Wayne Martin, executive director of the Arts Council

﹛﹛Pokey LaFarge concert rescheduled

﹛﹛June 24, 2020

﹛﹛The Pokey LaFarge concert originally scheduled for Saturday, May 9, at the Historic Earle Theatre has been rescheduled for Saturday, Jan. 23, 2021, at 7:30 p.m.

﹛﹛LaFarge*s music is a mix of Americana, early jazz, ragtime for string instruments, country blues, Western swing, and Appalachian folk. His diverse influences include Howlin* Wolf, Jimmie Rodgers, Bill Monroe, Emmett Miller and Willie Dixon. LaFarge was greatly influenced by his grandfathers, one of whom was a member of the St. Louis Banjo Club and gave LaFarge his first guitar and tenor banjo. After hearing Bill Monroe at age 16, LaFarge traded the guitar his grandfather had given him for a mandolin.

﹛﹛NPR*s Stephen Thompson says that LaFarge*s music ※evokes the old-timey spirit of a thousand crackling 78 RPM records# But his albums never feel like cheap exercises in nostalgia, in part because LaFarge directs his old-fashioned sensibilities in the service of sharp, infectious new material.§ 2011*s Riverboat Soul, produced by Phil Harris, used only vintage instruments and electronics. Both it and 2012*s Middle of Everywhere won the Independent Music Award for Best Americana Album.

﹛﹛Tickets are $35 to $55 and are available online at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pokey-lafarge-tickets-109853248022 or via phone at 336-786-7998. Those who have already purchased tickets can roll them forward to the new date and retain the same seat. If you cannot attend the rescheduled show, refund requests should be made to Heather Wilson at heatherw@surryarts.org by June 30. For additional information about the show, contact Courtney Thompson at courtney@surryarts.org or 336-786-7998.

﹛﹛Nunn Brothers festival canceled

﹛﹛June 17, 2020

﹛﹛A summer tradition for local bluegrass music lovers which would have celebrated its 22nd anniversary this year has been canceled.

﹛﹛Twin brothers Alden and Arnold Nunn originated and have served as hosts of the annual Nunn Brothers Bluegrass Festival since its inception. The Nunn Brothers Music Park, located just east of Mount Airy in the small Woodville community, serves as home to the event.

﹛﹛The brothers annually host well-known bluegrass groups and performers to the stage as a tribute to the music*s rich area tradition and its role in the Nunn family history. The festival is dedicated to the brothers* late parents, Clarence Olin Nunn and Alzry Nunn.

﹛﹛This year*s festival had been scheduled for July 23-26.

﹛﹛※We already had some of the bands lined up for this year when this (the COVID-19 pandemic and related mandates) hit,※ Arnold Nunn said. ※We had a lot of people asking if we were going to hold it, some from as far away as a five-hour drive. A lot of people plan on this and we knew we needed to make a decision and get the word out.§

﹛﹛The decision to cancel didn*t come quickly nor was it an easy one for the brothers.

﹛﹛※It can be hard to pull together and it takes some time,§ Alden Nunn said. ※We need to arrange bands and our sponsors and we weren*t sure we could count on a decent turn-out. There*s a lot of preparation and details involved.§

﹛﹛The Nunns said they were following closely as bluegrass festivals in Mount Airy and Galax, Virginia, were canceled and gradually began to believe that canceling their event was the right thing to do. Held in the heart of summer, the brothers explained that the weather was usually hot and, while many would opt to rely on masks as a safety measure, they would be uncomfortable.

﹛﹛※We really hate it,§ Alden Nunn said of the decision to cancel. ※We want to continue this bluegrass tradition and it*s sad for us. We want to thank all our sponsors and everybody who has come out and supported us through the years. We want everybody to know that we*re already looking forward to bringing it back next year during the last full weekend in July.§

﹛﹛※We*re going to miss it,§ Arnold Nunn said. ※Everybody always enjoys the music and the chance to come together to see each other. For us, it*s like a big family reunion and we*re looking forward to doing it again next year.§

﹛﹛June 11, 2020

﹛﹛Scholarship funds are available for area youth who would like to attend Surry Arts Council summer camps.

﹛﹛Dr. John L. Gravitte and Associates has contributed funds to assist area youth in participating in Surry Arts Council summer camps again this year.

﹛﹛The Kester Sink Birthday Endowment also supports summer camp scholarships.

﹛﹛Surry Arts Council is offering a variety of camps.

﹛﹛Arts Alive 每 Around the World for ages 6-11 is Monday to Thursday, June 15-18.

﹛﹛Princess Training Camp for ages 3 and older is Monday to Friday, June 22-26.

﹛﹛Surry Strings Camp, with music instruction by Jim Vipperman, for ages 5 and older, is Monday to Thursday, July 13-16.

﹛﹛Kids Visual Arts Camp has two ages groups: ages 9-16 is Monday to Friday, July 20-24, and ages 4-8 is July 27-31.

﹛﹛Dance Camp is Monday to Friday, July 27-31, with sections for ages 3-6 and ages 7-12.

﹛﹛Youth Acting Camp has two camps this year. Holka Polka: A Wizard of Oz Parody (ages 8-18) is Monday to Friday, June 22-26, and Monday to Thursday, June 29-2. The Hysterical History of the Trojan War (ages 11-18) is Monday to Friday, July 20-24 and July 27-31.

﹛﹛Creative Writing Camp is Monday to Friday, July 13-17, with sessions for ages 7-11 and ages 12 and older.

﹛﹛Due to state guidelines, the number of campers per session is limited. The campers will be practicing social distancing and must bring their own snack and drink for snack time. Masks are recommended. Parents are asked to check their children*s temperature each day and keep them home if they show any of the following symptoms: temperature of 100.4 or greater; coughing; shortness of breath or difficulty breathing; chills; new loss of taste or smell; vomiting; or diarrhea.

﹛﹛To apply for scholarships, contact Courtney Thompson, director of operations, at courtney@surryarts.org or 336-786-7998. For additional information, or to register, visit the Surry Arts Council website (www.surryarts.org) or call the office at 336-786-7998.

﹛﹛May 27, 2020

﹛﹛Throughout the stay-at-home order, Surry Arts Council has been offering online and other arts activities to individuals in the community, and continues to do so.

﹛﹛One summer highlight for many area youth is attending some of the many area camps, including those offered by the council. The local organization recently announced its summer 2020 plans, with some limitations in place as a result of COVID 19.

﹛﹛Underway now, or coming this summer, activities include:

﹛﹛? Madeline Matanick is offering private art lessons for children and adults. These sessions can be used to work on painting, drawing, or crafts. The mediums offered are acrylic, watercolor, and mixed media. Private lessons can be for individuals or groups of two or three. Sessions can be scheduled by email (madi@surryarts.org) or text (843-697-8351).

﹛﹛She is also hosting Virtual Paint Classes on Zoom. She packs individual paint kits (with a lightly traced canvas, paints, a plate, a brush, and a napkin) for drive-by pick up in the Andy Griffith Playhouse parking lot and then everyone connects via Zoom for the step-by-step painting class. After registration, participants will be notified of pick up time for all materials and given log-in instructions for the class. Virtual Paint Classes are being offered weekly. The next class is ※Doodle-Do!§ and it*s designed for kids and adults. The link can be found on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/events/380574129503902/ For additional information, contact Madeline at Madi@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛? Shelby Coleman is offering private dance classes for individuals and small groups. Any style, technique, beginning dance, or beginning tumbling are available. The classes can be scheduled in the evenings for one dancer, or groups of two to four dancers. To schedule private classes, or for any additional information, contact Coleman at shelby@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛She is providing online classes on Facebook as well. Classes vary from line dancing to dance fitness to conditioning and more. The classes are currently every other night. Those interested should search Facebook for ※Shelby*s Online Classes.§ The group is private, but she approves requests promptly. Once a member of the group, the classes can be live-streamed or watch at any time. For singers of all ages, Zoom Karaoke is every Tuesday at 7 p.m. Each week features a different theme. Email Coleman at shelby@surryarts.org for link and password.

﹛﹛Camps

﹛﹛Matanick, Coleman, and Heather Elliott will be teaching all classes and day camps listed here except Surry Strings. Jim Vipperman will be leading the Surry Strings camp. Current summer camp offerings include:

﹛﹛? Arts Alive 每 Around The World, for ages 3-5. Monday, June 8 每 Thursday, June 11. Session 1: 9:30 a.m.- 11:30 a.m. Session 2: 12:30 p.m.- 2:30 p.m. Due to state guidelines, Arts Alive Ages 3-5 will be limited to 20 campers per session with 10 in each class. The campers will be practicing social distancing and must bring their own snack and drink for snack time. Masks are recommended.

﹛﹛? Arts Alive 每 Around The World, for ages 6-11, Monday, June 15 每 Thursday, June 18. Session 1: 9:30 a.m. 每 noon. Session 2: 12:30 p.m.每 3 p.m. Due to state guidelines, Arts Alive ages 6-11 will be limited to 30 campers per session with 10 in each class. The campers will be practicing social distancing and must bring their own snack and drink for snack time. Masks are recommended.

﹛﹛? Arts Alive Parade/Performance/Festival Thursday, June 28, with the time to be announced on first day of each session

﹛﹛These activities may be modified based on state guidelines. Participants will be notified as guidelines are updated.

﹛﹛Princess Training Camp, ages 3 and older, Monday, June 22 每 Friday, June 26. Session 1: 10 a.m. 每 noon. Session 2: 1 p.m. 每 3 p.m. Due to state guidelines, the camp 2020 will be limited with 10 campers per session. The campers will be practicing social distancing and must bring their own snack and drink for snack time. Masks are recommended.

﹛﹛? Princess Crowning/Performance. These activities will be modified based on state guidelines. Participants will be notified as guidelines are updated.

﹛﹛Acting and Music

﹛﹛? Youth Acting Camp: Mythical Creatures And How To Approach Them, ages 10-18, Monday, June 22 每 Friday, June 26, and Monday, June 29 每 Thursday, July 2, 2 p.m.- 5 p.m. Due to state guidelines, Princess Training Camp 2020 will be limited to 10 campers. The campers will be practicing social distancing and must bring their own snack and drink for snack time. Masks are recommended. The class-ending performance will be on July 2.

﹛﹛? Surry Strings Camp, ages 5 and older, Monday, July 13 每 Thursday, July 16, 10 a.m. 每 noon, limited with 10 campers. The campers will be practicing social distancing and must bring their own snack and drink for snack time. Masks are recommended.

﹛﹛? Missoula Children*s Theatre Camp scheduled for July 13-18 has been cancelled.

﹛﹛? Kids Visual Arts Camp, ages 9-16, Monday, July 20 每 Friday, July 24, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., limited with 10 campers. The campers will be practicing social distancing and must bring their own snack and drink for snack time. Masks are recommended. This final exhibition format may be modified based on state guidelines. Participants will be notified as guidelines are updated.

﹛﹛? Youth Acting Camp: Willa Wonkie And The College Tour, ages 11-18, Monday, July 20 每 Friday, July 24, and Monday, July 27 每 Friday, July 31, 3 p.m. 每 5 p.m., limited to 10 campers. The campers will be practicing social distancing and must bring their own snack and drink for snack time. Masks are recommended. The final performance will be on July 31 at 4 p.m.

﹛﹛Dance and Art

﹛﹛? Dance Camp 2020, ages 3-6, Monday, July 27 每 Friday, July 31, 9:30 a.m. 每 11 a.m. Limited to 10 campers. The campers will be practicing social distancing and must bring their own snack and drink for snack time. Masks are recommended.

﹛﹛? Dance Camp ages 7-12, Monday July 27- Friday, July 31, 11 a.m. 每 12:30 p.m., limited with 10 campers. The campers will be practicing social distancing and must bring their own snack and drink for snack time. Masks are recommended.

﹛﹛? Kids Visual Arts Camp, ages 4-8, Monday, July 27- Friday, July 31, 11 a.m. 每 12:30 p.m. limited to 10 campers. The campers will be practicing social distancing and must bring their own snack and drink for snack time. Masks are recommended.

﹛﹛April 20, 2020

﹛﹛As a result of the continued shelter-in-place order imposed by Gov. Roy Cooper, the Surry Arts Council has announced several concerts scheduled for the Blackmon Amphitheatre have been canceled.

﹛﹛※We are waiting for more guidelines from Gov. Cooper before announcing further cancellations,§ said Executive Director Tanya Jones. ※At this point, our plan is to reschedule concerts canceled if funding〞and guidelines 〞 permit. We appreciate your patience and look forward to getting back. We will ask that all patrons without annual passes have exact change. We also will increase the age admitted free to ages 18 and under so that families of school age children can attend together.§

﹛﹛The shows canceled include:

﹛﹛? Thursday, April 30, The Embers

﹛﹛? Friday, May 1, Carolina Soul Band

﹛﹛? Saturday, May 2, Will Jones Band

﹛﹛? Thursday, May 7, Blackwater Rhythm and Blues Band

﹛﹛? Friday, May 8, The Catalinas

﹛﹛? Thursday, May 14, Liquid Pleasure

﹛﹛? Friday, May 15, Souljam

﹛﹛Fiddlers convention called off

﹛﹛April 13, 2020

﹛﹛For the first time in nearly 50 years, there will be no Blue Grass & Old-Time Fiddler*s Convention in Mount Airy.

﹛﹛Jerry Estes, who serves on the committee overseeing the event, said Monday the annual music festival has fallen victim to fall-out from the COVID-19 pandemic, citing a variety of factors that played into the decision. This would have been the 49th consecutive convention.

﹛﹛※We*d had a big drop in the reservations, people who usually come every year called and cancelled,§ he said.

﹛﹛He explained for many old time music fans, the Mount Airy convention is just one of a series they visit each year, with some fans adopting a nomadic existence during the spring and summer, traveling across North Carolina, Virginia, and other states, from one event to the next. The events that come the weekend before and the weekend after Mount Airy had already canceled, and some of those fans simply decided they wouldn*t attend Mount Airy*s as a result.

﹛﹛Estes said the committee never seriously considered delaying the event.

﹛﹛※People plan their vacations around it, you couldn*t ask someone who*s working who has vacation scheduled in June to just take their vacation in August instead,§ he said.

﹛﹛The event, which he claimed brings between 25,000 and 50,000 people to the city each year, is usually a significant boon to area restaurants and hotels. Those businesses have largely either been closed or have their operations restricted by Gov. Roy Cooper*s stay-at-home order. While the order is set to expire April 29, there is a possibility it could be extended, not to mention the fact that many of the convention*s visitors live in states where such orders are also in place.

﹛﹛He said trying to keep the convention open this year on its regular schedule, or postponing it until later in the year, was simply impractical.

﹛﹛The decision affects Surry Arts Council operations as well, although there is still a possibility some of the workshops scheduled for that weekend could go on, albeit on a smaller scale.

﹛﹛※The annual fiddlers* convention is Mount Airy*s opportunity to promote our unique old-time music heritage for guests that come from all over the world,§ said Tanya Jones, arts council executive director. ※The arts council has worked with Veterans Park Board and the North Carolina Arts Council for over 25 years to make area music icons and masters available to fiddlers* convention guests to promote old-time music. For the past two years, the arts council has hosted an old-time retreat at Veterans Park the week prior to the Fiddlers Convention in addition to working with Veterans Park officials to offer free workshops for everyone on Friday.§

﹛﹛She went on to say the arts council has canceled all of the free workshops set for Friday, June 5, but there*s still a chance some of the Saturday, June 6 workshops could be held.

﹛﹛※We are hopeful that we can offer these on a very small scale at the Earle Theatre if the health and safety of our artists and our guests can be assured. We will continue to wait for Gov. Cooper*s next advice regarding May and June gatherings before we make this decision. The convention is so important to our community but the health and safety of our artists and guests is our focus at this time.§

﹛﹛Park closing

﹛﹛Estes said in addition to cancelling the convention, the two organizations which govern Veterans Memorial Park in Mount Airy 〞 the local chapters of the American Legion Post 123 and the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2019 〞 have decided to close the park for public use.

﹛﹛The closure went into effect at midnight on Sunday, and is indefinite. He said the Park Meeting Hall is still available for use, but only with significant restrictions on the type of activity, number of people, and other regulations until the governor lifts or amends the stay-at-home order and social distancing guidelines.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/web1_Fi-3.jpg

﹛﹛Veteran*s Park also closed to public

﹛﹛By John Peters

﹛﹛jpeters@mtairynews.com

﹛﹛Surry Central takes part in Va. art show

﹛﹛March 23, 2020

﹛﹛CRITZ, Va. 〞 The 5th-Annual Student Art Show opened on Sunday, March 8, to more than 100 students, teachers, parents, and friends who came out to celebrate Student Art Month.

﹛﹛This year*s show has submissions from 13 schools, including 159 artists in grades 6 and up and more than 230 pieces on exhibition.

﹛﹛Participating schools include North Stokes, Surry Central, and Millennium Charter Academy from North Carolina. These join Virginia high schools Patrick County, Bassett, Martinsville, and Magna Vista.

﹛﹛Younger students from Virginia attend such schools as Blue Ridge Elementary, Hardin Reynolds Memorial, Stuart Elementary, Meadows of Dan Elementary, Martinsville Middle and Laurel Park Middle. Homeschool students were also eligible to participate.

﹛﹛The exhibition will remain on display at Reynolds Homestead, 463 Homestead Lane, through Friday, April 17. Because of all the virus cancellations and postponements, call the gallery before attempting to visit at (276) 694-7181.

﹛﹛2020 Reynolds Homestead Student Art Show Winners:

﹛﹛? Best Emerging Artist: $25 每 Tillee Hauser, Stuart Elementary, ※Trash to Treasure,§ Recycled Sculpture§

﹛﹛? Best in Show: $60 每 Jennifer Castro, Bassett High, ※Hushed,§ Charcoal

﹛﹛Painting and Mixed Media

﹛﹛? 1st Place 每 $40 每 Patience Scott, Magna Vista High, ※A$AP Rocky,§ Acrylic

﹛﹛? 2nd Place 每 $30 每 Elizabeth Luckado, Patrick County High, ※Space Harpy,§ Mixed Media

﹛﹛? 3rd Place 每 $20 每 Joshua Marion, Surry Central, ※For All the Children,§ Acrylic on Slides

﹛﹛Drawing

﹛﹛? 1st Place 每 $40 每 Joseph Giles, Magna Vista High, ※The Stage Is Set,§ Colored Pencil

﹛﹛? 2nd Place 每 $30 每 Madison Ross, Bassett High, ※She,§ Pencil

﹛﹛? 3rd Place 每 $20 每 Elizabeth Smith, Magna Vista High, ※Flower Boy,§ Colored Pencil

﹛﹛Photography

﹛﹛? 1st Place 每 $40 每 Alexis Morgan, North Stokes, ※Lexi,§ Digitally edited photography

﹛﹛? 2nd Place 每 $30 每 Emma Bingman, North Stokes, ※Yellowstone Geothermal Pool,§ Photography

﹛﹛? 3rd Place 每 $20 每 Quentin Lingerfelt, North Stokes, ※Space,§ Photography

﹛﹛Three Dimensional

﹛﹛? 1st Place 每 $40 每 Rose George-Ambrocia, Bassett High, ※The Me Inside of Me,§ Mixed Media

﹛﹛? 2nd Place 每 $30 每 Ivet Sanchez, Millennium Charter Academy, ※Bird Man,§ Clay

﹛﹛? 3rd Place 每 $20 每 Laken Creed, Surry Central, ※Lap Loom Weaving,§ Fiber

﹛﹛Merit Awards 每 $15 each

﹛﹛? Ella Hazelwood, Stuart Elementary, ※Sunrise Glory,§ Photography

﹛﹛? Bryan Clark, Stuart Elementary, ※Checkers Set,§ Woodworking

﹛﹛? Caesar Kamari Draper, Martinsville Middle, ※Sky High Chandelier,§ Glass

﹛﹛? Hannah Ferguson, Magna Vista High, ※Privacy,§ Colored Pencil

﹛﹛? Cory Osborne, Magna Vista High, ※The Wild,§ Colored Pencil

﹛﹛? Layne Stone, North Stokes High, ※A Wonderful View,§ Drawing

﹛﹛? Evan Pruitt, Magna Vista High, ※Stop,§ Colored Pencil

﹛﹛? Alexis Cox, Hardin Reynolds Memorial School, ※Midnight Colors,§ Acrylic

﹛﹛? Emma Pendleton, Homeschool, ※Dilly Joe,§ Pencil

﹛﹛Bull Mountain Artist Award 每 $25.00

﹛﹛? Maria Vasquez-Chavez, Bassett High, ※Untitled,§ Graphite

﹛﹛Purchase Awards

﹛﹛? Alexis Morgan, North Stokes, ※Lexi,§ Photography

﹛﹛? Reili Moran, Stuart Elementary, ※Afternoon Snack,§ Photography

﹛﹛? Brandy Gregory, Stuart Elementary, ※The Arctic,§ Acrylic

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Rose George-Ambrocia, Bassett High School, took first place for ※The Me Inside of Me,§ Mixed Media.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_1st-3D.jpgRose George-Ambrocia, Bassett High School, took first place for ※The Me Inside of Me,§ Mixed Media.

﹛﹛Reynolds Homestead

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Alexis Morgan, North Stokes, won first place and a purchase award for ※Lexi§ 〞 digitally edited photography.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_1st-photography.jpgAlexis Morgan, North Stokes, won first place and a purchase award for ※Lexi§ 〞 digitally edited photography.

﹛﹛Reynolds Homestead

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Joshua Marion, Surry Central, earns third place in mixed media for ※For All the Children,§ acrylic on slides.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_3rd-painting.jpgJoshua Marion, Surry Central, earns third place in mixed media for ※For All the Children,§ acrylic on slides.

﹛﹛Reynolds Homestead

﹛﹛Staff Report

﹛﹛Art Matters

﹛﹛March 21, 2020

﹛﹛Art Matters is a weekly column which highlights some of the upcoming performance art, display art, and similar events in the greater Mount Airy area.

﹛﹛Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Surry Arts Council has canceled its public gatherings.

﹛﹛In an effort to continue to provide arts and entertainment to the community, the SAC staff has tried to come up with new ways to engage people using the internet.

﹛﹛One of those involves the Arts Alive summer camp, which explores arts and culture through music, dance and crafts.

﹛﹛※We are doing a T-shirt design contest for Arts Alive, which is an around-the-world theme this year,§ said Madi Matanick, the artistic and visual arts director. ※They have to draw a design that fits the theme.§

﹛﹛This theme include discovering something about each of the seven continents, such as culture, food, music and dress. Matanick said kids can check out the Surry Arts Count Facebook page for ideas about what to include in the design.

﹛﹛Barring any changes due to ongoing health concerns, the summer camp will be held on consecutive weeks in June. The first week will be for ages 3-5, then a week for ages 6-11. However, exceptions are allowed in some situations, such as siblings who want to be in the same week.

﹛﹛Working with Matanick on these ideas is Shelby Coleman, director of artistic and educational programs.

﹛﹛Tanya Jones, SAC executive director, announced the hiring of the two at the same time in January 2018.

﹛﹛※We received many, many resumes when we posted the position, but Madi and Shelby both stood out as exceptionally qualified candidates,§ said Jones.

﹛﹛Matanick is originally from Charleston, S.C., and obtained a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Musical Theater at Ohio Northern University with a minor in art. She toured with Missoula Children*s Theatre for two years. Aside from acting, she likes working in watercolor and acrylic paints, drawing and ceramics.

﹛﹛Coleman is originally from Kentucky and graduated from Morehead State University with a Bachelor of Arts in Theater with minors in business and dance.

﹛﹛In addition to touring with Missoula Children*s Theatre for two years, Coleman has worked as a teaching artist for Lexington Children*s Theatre, toured with The Little Company (an educational touring troupe), and taught dance at a collegiate level.

﹛﹛With the public events canceled, however, the part-time staffers were sent home, Jones said. This included Heather Elliott, who didn*t let that stop her.

﹛﹛? Elliott recorded a video ※Yoga with Heather§ and posted it to the SAC Facebook page on Thursday. By Friday afternoon it already had 47 shares.

﹛﹛? Coleman is seeking video submissions for a chance to be featured in a video compilation about ※Seussical Jr.§

﹛﹛Learn the song ※Oh the Things You Can Think§ and then send in your video of you performing the song, said Matanick. For those who don*t know the song yet, go to the SAC Facebook page and follow a link to a Google drive with musical clips.

﹛﹛The deadline for submission is 3 p.m. on Friday, March 27. Any age can take part.

﹛﹛? The arts council has been posting an SAC Quarantine Craft of the Day. All of the items are made from things you would likely have at home, said Matanick. The instructions and/or template can be printed out on a personal printer if desired.

﹛﹛? SAC holds youth dance programs. Those in the classes can contact the arts council to get access to videos taken of the dance routines so that they can practice at home. There will be a dance contest submission coming soon.

﹛﹛? Darrius and Gabe Flowers posted on the Facebook page a 19-minute video of the two playing guitar and mandolin and singing. Others are encouraged to do the same.

﹛﹛The arts council stated about these hard times on Facebook.

﹛﹛※Don*t let it knock you down. Stay positive. Stay active. Stay mindful. Stay artsy by doing the following:

﹛﹛※Pick up that paint brush, pencil or charcoal and paint, draw or sketch.

﹛﹛※Be free! Turn up the music and dance around the house with your kids, your significant other, or yourself # just dance!

﹛﹛※Sing or write a song.

﹛﹛※Do you play an instrument? Then learn a new song. If you don*t play an instrument, now is a good time to give it a try.

﹛﹛※If you enjoy theater, write your own play, or memorize lines from your favorite.

﹛﹛※Do you like poetry? Write your own poem or read your favorite poem out loud.

﹛﹛※Make your own short film.

﹛﹛※Whether you*re an amateur or professional photographer, take photographs. Try photographing something different.

﹛﹛※Do you knit or weave? Knit and weave away.

﹛﹛※The sky is the limit. Artistic expression is a powerful tool, helping us process the world around us. So, whatever you*re doing, share it with us on the Surry Arts Council Facebook and Instagram pages #sacartsmatter. We*d love to see how you*re staying artsy.※

﹛﹛〞 〞 〞

﹛﹛Folks can sign up for an arts council email newsletter to be notified of any reschedulings and new developments. Call the SAC office at 336-786-7998 to be added to the email list.

﹛﹛For additional information, visit the website at www.surryarts.org. Follow the SAC on Facebook at www.facebook.com/surryartscouncil/.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛With restrictions on crowds, the Surry Arts Council is looking for other ways to get the public involved.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_venues-1-2.jpgWith restrictions on crowds, the Surry Arts Council is looking for other ways to get the public involved.

﹛﹛Surry Arts Council

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Shelby Coleman joined the Surry Arts Council in January 2018 after graduating from Morehead State University with a Bachelor of Arts in Theater with minors in Business and Dance.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_ShelbyColeman.jpgShelby Coleman joined the Surry Arts Council in January 2018 after graduating from Morehead State University with a Bachelor of Arts in Theater with minors in Business and Dance.

﹛﹛Surry Arts Council

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Madi Matanick has a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Musical Theatre at Ohio Northern University with a minor in art. She toured with Missoula Children*s Theatre for two years before joining the SAC in January 2018.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_MadiChitty.jpgMadi Matanick has a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Musical Theatre at Ohio Northern University with a minor in art. She toured with Missoula Children*s Theatre for two years before joining the SAC in January 2018.

﹛﹛Surry Arts Council

﹛﹛By Jeff Linville

﹛﹛jlinville@mtairynews.com

﹛﹛Reach Jeff at 415-4692.

﹛﹛Art Matters

﹛﹛March 16, 2020

﹛﹛Art Matters is a weekly column which highlights some of the upcoming performance art, display art, and similar events in the greater Mount Airy area. For ticket information, contact The Surry Arts Council. NOTE: Given that many events are being cancelled or postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak, call ahead to ensure the activity you plan to visit is still scheduled.

﹛﹛Saturday

﹛﹛Rhonda Vincent and the Rage in concert beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the Historic Earle Theatre. Tickets are $35-$55. One of the most awarded bands in bluegrass history, Rhonda Vincent and the Rage have won a Grammy and 19 IBMA awards (including Entertainer of the Year as well as Female Vocalist of the Year) among many others.

﹛﹛Ongoing Programs

﹛﹛Improv Troupe. If interested, contact Madeline Matanick at 336-786-7998 or madi@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛Kids Art (ages 5-10), Mondays, March 2-March 23, 4-5 p.m., Surry Arts Council Photo Gallery, $30 per month. From finger painting to portraiture, come explore the amazing world of art! Learn about shape, composition, color, and much more.

﹛﹛Drawing and Painting, (ages 9 and up), Tuesdays, March 3-March 24, 4-5 p.m., Surry Arts Council Photo Gallery, $30. Class will dive into the basics of drawing and painting, focusing on perspective, color, and composition using pencil, pen, acrylic paint, and watercolors. A great class for students of all skill levels.

﹛﹛Special Friends Line Dance Class, Tuesdays, 11 a.m., Andy Griffith Museum Theatre, free. Shelby Coleman leads this class for Special Friends to have fun and move.

﹛﹛Painting for Adults, Tuesdays, March 3-March 24, Surry Arts Council Photo Gallery, 1-2:30 p.m., $30. This is a great class for artists of all skill levels. We will explore your personal painting style with one-on-one instruction in a relaxed, fun environment. This is a great class to meet friends, learn new skills, and work on pieces you want to paint. Suitable for teenagers and adults, all materials provided.

﹛﹛Clogging Classes, Tuesdays, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Andy Griffith Museum Theatre. Rhythmic Expression offers a variety of styles for all ages. Visit https://www.rhythmicexpressionclogging.com for additional information.

﹛﹛Free TAPS (Traditional Arts Programs) Youth Flatfoot Dance Lessons, Thursdays, 4:30-5 p.m. Historic Earle Theatre Learn this fun, percussive traditional dance. This program is sponsored in part by a TAPS grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛Free TAPS (Traditional Arts Programs) Youth Music Lessons, Thursdays, 5:30-6:15 p.m. fiddle; 6:15-6:45 p.m., guitar, banjo, and mandolin; Historic Earle Theatre. Award-winning musician and instructor Jim Vipperman teaches and instruments are provided. Come learn fiddle, mandolin, guitar or banjo! This program is sponsored in part by a TAPS grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛Free Jam Session, Thursdays, 7 p.m., Historic Earle Theatre. Local and visiting musicians are welcome. Music ranges from bluegrass and old-time to gospel and country. Musicians take turns playing, singing, and backing up others. Many come just to sit and listen or dance. This program is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛New Community Chorus, Fridays, 6 p.m., Andy Griffith Museum Theatre. Join Marie Nicholson and John Rees to lift your voices. Open to all, come and bring a friend.

﹛﹛***

﹛﹛For additional information or to purchase tickets or register for classes, contact the Surry Arts Council at (336) 786-7998 or visit the website at www.surryarts.org. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/surryartscouncil/.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_venues-1-1.jpg

﹛﹛Youth winners in Jarrell festival named

﹛﹛March 09, 2020

﹛﹛While the annual Tommy Jarrell Festival holds a lot of activities for area music lovers 〞 dance and instrument lessons, a dance and concert, along with workshops and other activities 〞 one of the highlights of the event is the youth competition.

﹛﹛This year was no different, with scores of youth from across North Carolina and Virginia on hand to compete.

﹛﹛The age 5-12 winners were:

﹛﹛每 Fiddle first place: Cheynne Grantham, Boones Mill, Virginia;

﹛﹛每 Fiddle second place: Hunter Hiatt, State Road;

﹛﹛每 Fiddle third place: Camden Fain, Ararat, Virginia;

﹛﹛每 Clawhammer Banjo first place: Wyatt Grantham, Boones Mill;

﹛﹛每 Guitar first place: Evan Bush, Mount Airy;

﹛﹛每 Dance first place: Camden Fain, Ararat, Virginia;

﹛﹛每 Vocal first place: Cheyenne Grantham, Boones Mill.

﹛﹛The age 13-18 winners were:

﹛﹛每 Fiddle first place: Darrius Flowers, Pilot Mountain;

﹛﹛每 Fiddle second place: Victoria Blakley, Tobaccoville;

﹛﹛每 Fiddle third place: Neely Sizemore, Elkin;

﹛﹛每 Dance first place: Darrius Flowers, Pilot Mountain

﹛﹛每 Vocal first place: Christina Blakley, Tobaccoville;

﹛﹛每 Vocal second place: Gabriele Blakley, Tobaccoville;

﹛﹛每 Band first place: Highway 268 每 Neely Sizemore, Gabe Flowers and Darrius Flowers, Elkin and Pilot Mountain

﹛﹛每 Twin Fiddle first Place: Gabrielle and Victoria Blakley, Tobaccoville.

﹛﹛Officials at Surry Arts Council, organizers of the festival, said they extend their thanks to Lew Bode for emceeing the competition and Jim Vipperman for providing accompaniment.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Many of the winners of the Tommy Jarrell Festival youth competition pose for a photo.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_TJ-Youth-Winners-2002-7212.jpgMany of the winners of the Tommy Jarrell Festival youth competition pose for a photo.

﹛﹛Submitted photo

﹛﹛Art Matters

﹛﹛March 09, 2020

﹛﹛Art Matters is a weekly column which highlights some of the upcoming performance art, display art, and similar events in the greater Mount Airy area. For ticket information, contact The Surry Arts Council.

﹛﹛Tuesday

﹛﹛Surry County Basket Makers, Siamese Twins Exhibit, 6 p.m. Members of the Basket Makers craft beautiful handmade baskets every month. Each meeting has a different instructor and topic, so material fees vary. New members are always welcome, contact Deborah Wagoner at 336-374-6530 for information or to register.

﹛﹛Movies This Week

﹛﹛Frozen II (PG). Sunday, March 8, at 4 and 7 p.m.; Monday, March 9, at 7 p.m.; and Wednesday, March 11, at 7 p.m. Anna, Elsa, Kristoff, Olaf, and Sven leave Arendelle to travel to an ancient, autumn-bound forest of an enchanted land. They set out to find the origin of Elsa*s powers in order to save their kingdom.

﹛﹛***

﹛﹛Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (PG-13). Friday, March 13, at 7 p.m. and Saturday, March 14, at 4 and 7 p.m. The surviving members of the resistance face the First Order once again, and the legendary conflict between the Jedi and the Sith reaches its peak bringing the Skywalker saga to its end.

﹛﹛Ongoing Programs

﹛﹛Improv Troupe. If interested, contact Madeline Matanick at 336-786-7998 or madi@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛Kids Art (ages 5-10), Mondays, March 2-March 23, 4-5 p.m., Surry Arts Council Photo Gallery, $30 per month. From finger painting to portraiture, come explore the amazing world of art! Learn about shape, composition, color, and much more.

﹛﹛Drawing and Painting, (ages 9 and up), Tuesdays, March 3-March 24, 4-5 p.m., Surry Arts Council Photo Gallery, $30. Class will dive into the basics of drawing and painting, focusing on perspective, color, and composition using pencil, pen, acrylic paint, and watercolors. A great class for students of all skill levels.

﹛﹛Special Friends Line Dance Class, Tuesdays, 11 a.m., Andy Griffith Museum Theatre, free. Shelby Coleman leads this class for Special Friends to have fun and move.

﹛﹛Painting for Adults, Tuesdays, March 3-March 24, Surry Arts Council Photo Gallery, 1-2:30 p.m., $30. This is a great class for artists of all skill levels. We will explore your personal painting style with one-on-one instruction in a relaxed, fun environment. This is a great class to meet friends, learn new skills, and work on pieces you want to paint. Suitable for teenagers and adults, all materials provided.

﹛﹛Clogging Classes, Tuesdays, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Andy Griffith Museum Theatre. Rhythmic Expression offers a variety of styles for all ages. Visit https://www.rhythmicexpressionclogging.com for additional information.

﹛﹛Free TAPS (Traditional Arts Programs) Youth Flatfoot Dance Lessons, Thursdays, 4:30-5 p.m. Historic Earle Theatre Learn this fun, percussive traditional dance. This program is sponsored in part by a TAPS grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛Free TAPS (Traditional Arts Programs) Youth Music Lessons, Thursdays, 5:30-6:15 p.m. fiddle; 6:15-6:45 p.m., guitar, banjo, and mandolin; Historic Earle Theatre. Award-winning musician and instructor Jim Vipperman teaches and instruments are provided. Come learn fiddle, mandolin, guitar or banjo! This program is sponsored in part by a TAPS grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛Free Jam Session, Thursdays, 7 p.m., Historic Earle Theatre. Local and visiting musicians are welcome. Music ranges from bluegrass and old-time to gospel and country. Musicians take turns playing, singing, and backing up others. Many come just to sit and listen or dance. This program is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛New Community Chorus, Fridays, 6 p.m., Andy Griffith Museum Theatre. Join Marie Nicholson and John Rees to lift your voices. Open to all, come and bring a friend.

﹛﹛Tickets Now on Sale For#

﹛﹛Rhonda Vincent and the Rage, Saturday, March 21, 7:30 p.m. Historic Earle Theatre, $35-$55. One of the most awarded bands in bluegrass history, Rhonda Vincent and the Rage have won a Grammy and 19 IBMA awards (including Entertainer of the Year as well as Female Vocalist of the Year) among many others.

﹛﹛***

﹛﹛For additional information or to purchase tickets or register for classes, contact the Surry Arts Council at (336) 786-7998 or visit the website at www.surryarts.org. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/surryartscouncil/.

﹛﹛For additional information or to purchase tickets or register for classes, contact the Surry Arts Council at 336-786-7998 or visit the website at www.surryarts.org. Follow on Facebook at www.facebook.com/surryartscouncil/.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_venues-.jpg

﹛﹛March 04, 2020

﹛﹛WINSTON-SALEM 每 A Mount Airy student was among nine high schoolers in the Visual Arts Program at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts whose work was recognized during the recent Scholastic Art & Writing Awards.

﹛﹛Jane Ferry, of Mount Airy, was one of five students who received a gold key for her work. Gold Key winners advance to national adjudication.

﹛﹛The awards were presented recently at Barton College in Wilson.

﹛﹛※These awards are well-deserved by our young artists who work very hard honing their craft,§ said Will Taylor, director of the Visual Arts Program. ※We*re proud to see them recognized for their talent, discipline and creative vision.§

﹛﹛In addition to Jane, other winners include:

﹛﹛? Alannah Couch of Warrenton, who won a Gold Key; Ace Kim of Apex, a Silver Key; Lorelei Lin of Cornelius, three Gold Keys, a Silver Key, and an American Visions Award nomination; Cora McAnulty of Kernersville, a Silver Key; Eduardo Rosario-Nieves of Charlotte, a Silver Key; Hami Trinh of Sanford, five Gold Keys, two Silver Keys, one Honorable Mention and an American Visions Award nomination; Ila Waller of Chapel Hill, two Gold Medals and two Honorable Mentions; Grace White of Clemmons, a Silver Key.

﹛﹛The nationally renowned Scholastic Art Awards program was created for middle and high school students to encourage student achievement, to recognize and applaud art teachers, and to emphasize the importance of the visual arts in the school curriculum.

﹛﹛Students from 131 schools entered the regional competition, submitting 3,445 works in categories including architecture, comic art, ceramics and glass, digital art, product design, drawing, fashion, film and animation, jewelry, mixed media, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture and video games. An additional 98 portfolios were submitted.

﹛﹛※Our visual artists are crafting incredible works in drawing, sculpture, design, mixed media, and digital media,§ said Michael Kelley, dean of Design and Production. ※We*re proud to see their work recognized in a highly competitive district. Congratulations to the winners and their faculty mentors: Will Taylor, Kaitlyn Botts and Elizabeth Alexander.§

﹛﹛The University of North Carolina School of the Arts is America*s first state-supported arts school, a unique stand-alone public university of arts conservatories. With a high school component, UNCSA is a degree-granting institution that trains young people of talent in dance, design and production, drama, film making, and music.

﹛﹛A (silent) blast from the past

﹛﹛March 03, 2020

﹛﹛This isn*t exactly your father*s night at the movies.

﹛﹛More like your great-grandfather*s.

﹛﹛That*s because the family movie being shown Saturday at Central United Methodist Church of Mount Airy is Harold Lloyd*s 1925 comedy classic ※The Freshman.§

﹛﹛Yes, you read that right 〞 1925. A silent movie.

﹛﹛What makes this showing so special is the live orchestra accompaniment movie-goers will hear as the picture show plays out on the big screen.

﹛﹛The Ivy Leaf Orchestra, a ten-person musical ensemble which emulates silent film orchestras of the 1910s and 20s, will be in the house, playing the sometimes whimsical, sometimes foreboding, but always on-target live sound track that the old silent films were known for.

﹛﹛The orchestra is under the direction of Rebecca and Eric Cook, two Mount Airy residents who began doing silent movie music years ago when they were living in Pennsylvania.

﹛﹛Eric Cook said the two became involved with silent film accompaniment about a dozen years ago, when he played an organ during the screening of a silent movie at a church in Western Pennsylvania.

﹛﹛※I did that for four or five years,§ he said, while he and his wife researched what music was like for silent films in the 1910s and 1920s. Turns out, with no sound available with the movies, it was up to individual cinema houses across the nation to come up with their own music to play with the films. Sheet music was available, specifically produced to be used with silent films, but the cinema had to supply the musicians.

﹛﹛A lot of the old movie houses of that day would have a local organist or piano player who sat through each screening of the movie, adding a dramatic flair to the showing with the musical accompaniment. Some cinemas went a step further, having an orchestra on hand for each screening.

﹛﹛※Thirty to 40% had an orchestra,§ Eric said. ※But that might mean anything from a piano, drum and violin on up to a full orchestra.§ Most, he said, would have between five and 15 musicians, though some of the large city theaters (think New York or Chicago) would employ a 70-piece orchestra.

﹛﹛After doing a little more research in Pennsylvania, Eric said he and his wife were able to secure a grant and put together an orchestra there, to play for silent movie nights at various venues throughout the region.

﹛﹛※We did that for four or five years,§ he said, before the couple moved to Montana for ※a couple of years.§

﹛﹛The two settled in Mount Airy in 2016, and Eric said he*s been working with Amy Snyder at the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History to learn more about the rich cinema house history in Mount Airy.

﹛﹛And to bring a bit of that history back this week, with a free Saturday screening of ※The Freshman§ open to the public.

﹛﹛When folks sit down and take in the movie, Eric Cook and his orchestra will have already seen the film several times in rehearsals.

﹛﹛※It*s a very unforgiving art form,§ he said. ※If you*ve ever played with live singers or dancers, it*s a lot like that. You have to respond to what they are doing and they have to respond to you.§

﹛﹛While playing for the movie is a little safer than playing for live performers, he said it*s still critical the musicians stay on course, attentive to where the movie is in its screening 〞 and be ready to improvise if the orchestra gets a little behind or ahead of the film.

﹛﹛Cook said he and his wife have been able to round up several orchestra players from the general area, with most coming from Forsyth and Winston-Salem.

﹛﹛※We*ve got really good musicians#I*m really impressed with the musicians we*ve found here.§

﹛﹛The music he said will be authentic to the time period, taken from his personal collection 〞 which consists of a library of roughly 2,500 musical selections from the silent movie era.

﹛﹛Cook said he*s hoping to put that large personal library to more use, aiming for this weekend*s event to be more than a one-time show in Mount Airy.

﹛﹛※I*d love to see a silent film festival at the Earle, that would be really cool,§ he said of the Historic Earle Theatre on Main Street.

﹛﹛For now, though, he*s putting the final touches on rehearsals for Saturday*s showing of ※The Freshman.§

﹛﹛The film will begin at 7 p.m. in the Central Church Social Hall at 1909 N. Main St. The program is free and includes free concessions of water and popcorn.

﹛﹛※The film follows the adventures of Harold Lloyd as he heads off to college,§ the public relations release of the film reads. ※Will he become the big man on campus and fulfill his dreams? Join Harold Lloyd as he tries to find a place on the varsity football team and struggles to win the girl of his dreams and outwit the college bully.

﹛﹛※The granddaddy of all comedy movies about life on campus, this film print is in excellent condition and is as fresh as the day it premiered almost a century ago.

﹛﹛※Harold &Speedy* Lamb heads off to Tate College and quickly discovers that making friends involves more than aping the antics he*s seen in the movies. He soon becomes the target of practical jokes and ridicule.

﹛﹛※To further his search for popularity, he tries out to join the football team, but gets accepted only as a combination water boy/tackling dummy.

﹛﹛※What follows is more of the action/comedy that only Lloyd could devise.§

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Intense focus is the order of the day for musicians rehearsing to play during Saturday*s screening of the silent film ※The Freshman§ at Central United Methodist Church in Mount Airy.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_JEFF8848_filtered.jpgIntense focus is the order of the day for musicians rehearsing to play during Saturday*s screening of the silent film ※The Freshman§ at Central United Methodist Church in Mount Airy.

﹛﹛Jeff Linville | The News

﹛﹛

﹛﹛While the auditorium is dark, musicians will need a little bit of light to keep track of the music they will be playing Saturday to accompany a silent film.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_JEFF8830_filtered.jpgWhile the auditorium is dark, musicians will need a little bit of light to keep track of the music they will be playing Saturday to accompany a silent film.

﹛﹛Jeff Linville | The News

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Practice, practice, practice was the order of the day recently as members of the Ivy Leaf Orchestra prepared to play music along with the silent film ※The Freshman§ Saturday in Mount Airy.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/web1_JEFF8824_filtered.jpgPractice, practice, practice was the order of the day recently as members of the Ivy Leaf Orchestra prepared to play music along with the silent film ※The Freshman§ Saturday in Mount Airy.

﹛﹛Jeff Linville | The News

﹛﹛1925 movie to feature live music

﹛﹛By John Peters

﹛﹛jpeters@mtairynews.com

﹛﹛Film festival entries open

﹛﹛February 26, 2020

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council is accepting submissions for the upcoming Surry Arts Film Festival 〞 but the deadline is fast approaching.

﹛﹛※We started the festival last year and it was a success,§ said Melissa Sumner. ※We*re hoping to build on that success for an even better event this year.§

﹛﹛Last year there were 12 submissions from five schools: East Surry High School, Mount Airy High School, North Surry High School, Surry Central High School, and UNC School of the Arts.

﹛﹛※It*s a great opportunity for students to showcase their original films at a professional theatre, and also to get feedback from professionals. We plan to have filmmakers from the area comment on submissions,§ Sumner said.

﹛﹛The deadline for submissions is Friday, March 6. Scoring elements include originality, production value, message, and entertainment value. Those selected for screening will be notified by Friday, March 27. The Film Festival is Tuesday, April 14, at 7 p.m. at the Historic Earle Theatre.

﹛﹛※I*m really looking forward to the Festival,§ Sumner said. ※Young people have a unique perspective, and their films express not only their creative vision but also what they consider important and noteworthy.§

﹛﹛Eligible applicants must be in grades 9-12 and films must have been produced during the 2019-2020 school year. For complete guidelines or any additional information, contact Sumner at 336-786-7998 or melissa@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Entrants in the first Surry Arts Film Festival, held in spring of 2019, pose for a photo at the Historic Earle Theatre.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_SAfilmfestivalgroup2019.jpgEntrants in the first Surry Arts Film Festival, held in spring of 2019, pose for a photo at the Historic Earle Theatre.

﹛﹛Local students have until March 6 to enter

﹛﹛Arts Ball draws record crowd

﹛﹛February 25, 2020

﹛﹛Mardi Gras revelers got a bit of a jump on the annual obsrvance recently 〞 at least the ones attending the Surry Arts Council*s annual Arts Ball held Feb. 21st at Cross Creek Country Club.

﹛﹛Arts council officials said the event enjoyed record attendance this year, raising money for Surry Arts programs in the schools.

﹛﹛School administrators were on hand to greet guests, thanking them for supporting cultural arts programming in the schools.

﹛﹛The Mardi Gras theme was carried out throughout the might with table decorations, booklets, and throughout the silent auction.

﹛﹛Will Sheppard, Surry Arts Council board member, thanked those attending and made interim announcements to alert folks of time remaining in the auction.

﹛﹛※Cross Creek staff and chef topped all prior efforts with passed hors d*oeuvres and soup, followed by a seated dinner featuring filet and salmon with chocolate mousse cake for dessert,§ the arts council said.

﹛﹛When guests weren*t dining or biding on the auction, many of them were on the dance floor as the popular Band of Oz played, with the dance floor never clearing until the last note was played.

﹛﹛Although the final count is not in, the goal of $25,000 ※was definitely met and exceeded,§ according to Melissa Sumner, event coordinator. ※The community was more generous than ever with donations# These funds will be used to support school arts programming in 2020-2021.§

﹛﹛Dozens of volunteers and school personnel worked to put together the silent auction. Sumner reported that ※This year was definitely the most popular ever,§ and she thanked the volunteer committee for their hard work, with more than 400 items being auctioned.

﹛﹛Dr. Tracey Lewis served as the liaison for the Surry County Schools, Carrie Venable served as liaison for the Mount Airy City Schools, and Danielle Davis represented Millennium Charter Academy. All of the schools participated with both donations and attendance. Surry Arts Council Board members, school personnel, and dozens of volunteers worked hard to organize the event, sell tickets, and ensure that the arts remain a part of our area school programming in 24 schools.

﹛﹛In addition to directly paying for arts programs, the Arts Ball proceeds leverage grants from the North Carolina Arts Council and South Arts.

﹛﹛※The TAPS grant provides support for several hundred students to have a hands-on experience with traditional stringed instruments,§ the arts council said. ※Jim Vipperman spends a week in each of three schools introducing students to fiddles, guitars, and Surry County*s traditional music heritage. Students are then able to attend the weekly free year-round lessons at the Historic Earle Theatre every Thursday afternoon if they wish to continue lessons.§

﹛﹛Other cultural arts programs provided during the current year included six performances of The Little Engine that Could, ArtsPower National Touring Theatre; two performances of The Nutcracker by the New York Ballet for Young Audiences; two performances of Best Christmas Pageant Ever by the Surry Arts Players; one performance of Deliver Us! By Ballet Magnificat!; and The Complete Works of William Shakespeare Abridged by the Surry Arts Players.

﹛﹛Additional programs include six performances of Fire of Freedom with Mike Wiley, 14 performances of Billy Goat Gruff by the A.J. Fletcher Opera Institute, UNCSA held in elementary schools; multiple monthly free movies, and additional programs for the special needs community and students that are sponsored in part by the United Fund of Surry coupled with Surry Arts Council support.

﹛﹛Arts programs funded by the Arts Ball facilitate more than 15,000 student contacts.

﹛﹛§It is the Surry Arts Council*s goal to send at least one program to each school in the Surry County School system, the Mount Airy City School system, and Millennium Charter Academy,§ the council said. ※Most schools receive two or three programs. Students in these 24 schools are also invited to one or more programs at the Andy Griffith Playhouse, the Historic Earle Theatre, and/or the Blackmon Amphitheatre.

﹛﹛※In addition, students visit and have guided tours at the Andy Griffith Museum, the Old-Time Music Heritage Hall, and the Siamese Twins Exhibit at no cost. School concerts and drama presentations are hosted by the Surry Arts Council throughout the year at no cost to the schools. The arts council works with schools to host interns and to provide art instruction in both in-school and after school programs along with many other partnerships.§

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Some visitors to the Surry Arts Council Arts Ball really got into the spirit of Mardi Gras, wearing traditional masks for a group photo.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_Arts-Ball-2002-3056.jpgSome visitors to the Surry Arts Council Arts Ball really got into the spirit of Mardi Gras, wearing traditional masks for a group photo.

﹛﹛Courtesy Hobart Jones

﹛﹛

﹛﹛The dance floor was crowded much of the night, whenever the Band of Oz played, during the Arts Ball.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_Arts-Ball-2002-2710.jpgThe dance floor was crowded much of the night, whenever the Band of Oz played, during the Arts Ball.

﹛﹛Courtesy Hobart Jones

﹛﹛

﹛﹛The Band of Oz kept the crowd entertained during the annual Arts Ball.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_Arts-Ball-2002-2409.jpgThe Band of Oz kept the crowd entertained during the annual Arts Ball.

﹛﹛Courtesy Hobart Jones

﹛﹛

﹛﹛A record crowd turned out for the annual Arts Ball, held recently at Cross Creek Country Club.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_Arts-Ball-2002-2255.jpgA record crowd turned out for the annual Arts Ball, held recently at Cross Creek Country Club.

﹛﹛Courtesy Hobart Jones

﹛﹛Art Matters

﹛﹛February 24, 2020

﹛﹛Art Matters is a weekly column which highlights some of the upcoming performance art, display art, and similar events in the greater Mount Airy area. For ticket information, contact The Surry Arts Council.

﹛﹛Thursday

﹛﹛Brews and Brushes: Petal to the Metal, White Elephant Beer Co., 225 Market Street, 6:30 p.m., $30. Create your own masterpiece. Complete with step-by-step instructions and light tracings, this one is easy and perfect for everyone. Come early beverages available for purchase. All materials provided.

﹛﹛Friday

﹛﹛Ribbon Cutting for Women in Surry County Old-Time Music Exhibit. Historic Earle Theatre, 1:30 p.m., Free. The Surry Arts Council will officially open the latest exhibit at the Historic Earle Theatre celebrating the long history and tradition of women in old-time music. This exhibit is supported in part by a grant from the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area Partnership.

﹛﹛***

﹛﹛Tommy Jarrell Festival Dance featuring The New Smokey Valley Boys with Trish Fore

﹛﹛Historic Earle Theatre, 7 p.m., $10.

﹛﹛Saturday

﹛﹛Strings of Life: Conversations with Old-Time Musicians, Historic Earle Theatre, 2 p.m., free. Join historian and author Kevin Donleavy who collected and recorded oral histories of old-time musicians in 11 Appalachian counties. This program is sponsored by the Surry Genealogical Association and is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛***

﹛﹛Tommy Jarrell Youth Competition, Andy Griffith Museum Theatre, 4 p.m., free. Categories are fiddle, clawhammer banjo, guitar, dance, vocal, and other (which includes all other instruments and bands), in two age levels: 5-12 and 13-18. Contestants have three minutes to perform and can have one accompanist (no recorded back-up is permitted). Winners are announced and trophies awarded at the end of the competition.

﹛﹛***

﹛﹛Tommy Jarrell Birthday Dance featuring Whitetop Mountain Band, Historic Earle Theatre, 7 p.m., $10.

﹛﹛Movies This Week

﹛﹛Just Mercy (PG-13). Sunday, Feb. 23, at 4 and 7 p.m.; Monday, Feb. 24, at 7 p.m.; and Wednesday, Feb. 26, at 7 p.m. A true story, Just Mercy follows young lawyer Bryan Stevenson (Michael B. Jordan) and his history-making battle for justice. One of his first and most incendiary cases is that of Walter McMillian (Jamie Foxx), who, in 1987, was sentenced to die for the murder of an 18-year-old girl despite a preponderance of evidence proving his innocence.

﹛﹛***

﹛﹛1917 (R). Sunday, March 1, at 4 and 7 p.m.; Monday, March 2 and Wednesday, March 4, at 7 p.m. each day. On April 6, 1917, as a regiment assembles to wage war deep in enemy territory, two soldiers are assigned to race against time and deliver a message that will stop 1,600 men from walking straight into a deadly trap. Winner of Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture 每 Drama and Best Director (Sam Mendes) and nominated for 10 Academy Awards including Best Motion Picture of the Year, Best Achievement in Directing, and Best Original Screenplay.

﹛﹛Ongoing Programs

﹛﹛Improv Troupe. If interested, contact Madeline Matanick at 336-786-7998 or madi@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛Kids Art (ages 5-10), Mondays, 4-5 p.m., Surry Arts Council Photo Gallery, $30 per month. From finger painting to portraiture, come explore the amazing world of art! Learn about shape, composition, color, and much more.

﹛﹛Drawing and Painting, (ages 11 and up), Monday, 5-6 p.m., Surry Arts Council Photo Gallery, $30. Class will dive into the basics of drawing and painting, focusing on perspective, color, and composition using pencil, pen, acrylic paint, and watercolors. A great class for students of all skill levels.

﹛﹛Special Friends Line Dance Class, Tuesdays, 11 a.m., Andy Griffith Museum Theatre, free. Shelby Coleman leads this class for Special Friends to have fun and move.

﹛﹛Clogging Classes, Tuesdays, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Andy Griffith Museum Theatre. Rhythmic Expression offers a variety of styles for all ages. Visit https://www.rhythmicexpressionclogging.com for additional information.

﹛﹛Free TAPS (Traditional Arts Programs) Youth Flatfoot Dance Lessons, Thursdays, 4:30-5 p.m. Historic Earle Theatre Learn this fun, percussive traditional dance. This program is sponsored in part by a TAPS grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛Free TAPS (Traditional Arts Programs) Youth Music Lessons, Thursdays, 5:30-6:15 p.m. fiddle; 6:15-6:45 p.m., guitar, banjo, and mandolin; Historic Earle Theatre. Award-winning musician and instructor Jim Vipperman teaches and instruments are provided. Come learn fiddle, mandolin, guitar or banjo! This program is sponsored in part by a TAPS grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛Free Jam Session, Thursdays, 7 p.m., Historic Earle Theatre. Local and visiting musicians are welcome. Music ranges from bluegrass and old-time to gospel and country. Musicians take turns playing, singing, and backing up others. Many come just to sit and listen or dance. This program is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛Tickets Now on Sale For#

﹛﹛Rhonda Vincent and the Rage, Saturday, March 21, 7:30 p.m. Historic Earle Theatre, $35-$55. One of the most awarded bands in bluegrass history, Rhonda Vincent and the Rage have won a Grammy and 19 IBMA awards (including Entertainer of the Year as well as Female Vocalist of the Year) among many others.

﹛﹛***

﹛﹛For additional information or to purchase tickets or register for classes, contact the Surry Arts Council at (336) 786-7998 or visit the website at www.surryarts.org. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/surryartscouncil/.

﹛﹛For additional information or to purchase tickets or register for classes, contact the Surry Arts Council at 336-786-7998 or visit the website at www.surryarts.org. Follow on Facebook at www.facebook.com/surryartscouncil/.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_venues-1-2.jpg

﹛﹛Valentine*s Day extra play is tonight

﹛﹛February 17, 2020

﹛﹛Valentine*s Day is over and done after Feb. 14, right?

﹛﹛Not so fast.

﹛﹛The Mount Airy Public Library*s teen theatre group, the Dewey Decimal Players, offer audiences another chance to share the love, with performances of the one-act play ※The Valentine Box.§ The first of the performances was on Monday evening, and the second is Tuesday, Feb. 18.

﹛﹛The comedy, written by Brack Llewellyn, takes place at the fictional George Spelvin High School. It*s only a few days until the much-anticipated Valentine Dance, but all is not well with the school*s students. Zoey (Alma Parsons) has a major crush on the resident Big Man on Campus. It*s hopeless, and Zoey is getting no support from best friend Beth (Emma Hiatt), a spoiled rich girl with issues of her own.

﹛﹛The big dance is in trouble as well. The local garage band hired to play for the dance, fronted by Arnie Dugan (Noah Wilkes) has cancelled for lack of a drummer, and the Dance Committee is falling apart, much to the dismay of its frazzled chairman Brian (Timmy Carpenter).

﹛﹛Zoey finds a glimmer of hope in classmate Samantha (Olivia Jessup), who is collecting handfulls of cards in her homemade Valentine Box. Zoey follows suit, putting up her own box in the hope that her crush will give her a valentine〞and an invitation to the dance.

﹛﹛Meanwhile, Senior Ambassador Harry (William Carpenter) is struggling with his indifferent study group, Scarlett (Sadie Watterson) and Miranda (Kate Sparks). Harry also decides to play Cupid, lining up a virtual ※clown car§ of potential dance dates for Miranda. All this time, shy student Mitchell (Rowan Bunton) waits in the background with a secret Valentine crush of his own.

﹛﹛※For a short play, there*s a lot going on,§ said Angela Llewellyn, founder of the Deweys and the play*s director. ※Fortunately, we have the character of Harry as the narrator. He keeps the audience up to speed throughout the show.§

﹛﹛Are there happy endings all around?

﹛﹛※Of course,§ said Llewellyn. ※In fact, Harry guarantees that in his opening monologue. This is a teen comedy, but there are also some very touching moments. The cast has done an amazing job with this play. I*m most proud of them.§

﹛﹛Performances of ※The Valentine Box§ are at 6:30 p.m. The play will be presented in the Mount Airy Public Library Multipurpose Room. Admission is free and the play is family-friendly.

﹛﹛For more information about ※The Valentine Box,§ the Dewey Decimal Players, or any library program, call 336-789-5108.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Katie Sparks, who plays Miranda in ※The Valentine Box§ rehearses a scene from the show.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_kate-valentine.jpgKatie Sparks, who plays Miranda in ※The Valentine Box§ rehearses a scene from the show.

﹛﹛Submitted photo

﹛﹛Art Matters

﹛﹛February 17, 2020

﹛﹛Art Matters is a weekly column which highlights some of the upcoming performance art, display art, and similar events in the greater Mount Airy area. For ticket information, contact The Surry Arts Council.

﹛﹛Sunday

﹛﹛Almost, Maine, Andy Griffith Playhouse, 3 p.m., $15-$20. One cold, clear night in the middle of winter, while the northern lights hover in the sky above, the residents of Almost, Maine, find themselves falling in and out of love in the strangest ways. Love is lost, found, and confounded and the people of Almost, Maine will never be the same.

﹛﹛Tuesday

﹛﹛Mount Airy Photography Club. Siamese Twins Exhibit, 7 p.m. Join Kenny Hooker and Hobart Jones as they explore topics of interest in digital photography. All experience levels are welcome. For inclusion on the email list, send email address to somersetva@aol.com.

﹛﹛Wednesday

﹛﹛Free Monthly Movie: Wonder (PG). Historic Earle Theatre, 4 p.m. Born with facial differences that have prevented him from going to a mainstream school until now, August Pullman becomes the most unlikely of heroes when he enters the local fifth grade. As his family, his classmates, and the larger community all struggle to discover their compassion and acceptance, Auggie*s extraordinary journey will unite them all and prove you can*t blend in when you were born to stand out.

﹛﹛Thursday

﹛﹛Brews and Brushes: Eiffel for You The Loaded Goat, 247 City Hall Street, 6:30 p.m., $30. Complete with step-by-step instructions and light tracings, this one is easy and perfect for everyone. Come early and enjoy food and beverages available for purchase. All materials provided.

﹛﹛Friday

﹛﹛Betty Lynn Visits, Andy Griffith Museum, 1 p.m., free with admission to Andy Griffith Museum ($8, $6 for ages 12 and younger). Meet the woman we all came to love as Barney*s sweetheart, Thelma Lou. She has photographs available for sale that she will autograph 每 note that photographs must be purchased with cash ($10).

﹛﹛***

﹛﹛Arts Ball, Cross Creek Country Club, 1129 Greenhill Road, $75. Silent auction, seated dinner, and dancing with the Band of Oz. Proceeds from Arts Ball are used to provide free cultural arts programming for Surry County Schools, Mount Airy City Schools, and Millennium Charter Academy.

﹛﹛Saturday

﹛﹛Yoga with Heather, Andy Griffith Museum Theatre, 10:30 a.m. Free. This hour-long yoga class is open to all levels. Bring your own mat or a towel. For questions or additional information, contact Heather Elliott at 336-786-7998 or heather@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛Movies This Week

﹛﹛Jumanji: The Next Level (PG-13). Sunday, Feb. 16, at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.; Monday, Feb. 17 and Wednesday, Feb. 19, at 7 p.m. each day. The gang is back but the game has changed! As they return to rescue one of their own, the players will have to brave parts unknown to escape the world*s most dangerous game. Starring Dwayne Johnson, Jack Black, and Kevin Hart.

﹛﹛***

﹛﹛Just Mercy (PG-13). Friday, Feb. 21, at 7 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 22, at 4 and 7 p.m.; Sunday, Feb. 23, at 4 and 7 p.m.; Monday, Feb. 24, at 7 p.m.; and Wednesday, Feb. 26, at 7 p.m. A true story, Just Mercy follows young lawyer Bryan Stevenson (Michael B. Jordan) and his history-making battle for justice. One of his first and most incendiary cases is that of Walter McMillian (Jamie Foxx), who, in 1987, was sentenced to die for the murder of an 18-year-old girl despite a preponderance of evidence proving his innocence.

﹛﹛Ongoing Programs

﹛﹛Improv Troupe. If interested, contact Madeline Matanick at 336-786-7998 or madi@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛Kids Art (ages 5-10), Mondays, 4-5 p.m., Surry Arts Council Photo Gallery, $30 per month. From finger painting to portraiture, come explore the amazing world of art! Learn about shape, composition, color, and much more.

﹛﹛Drawing and Painting, (ages 11 and up), Monday, 5-6 p.m., Surry Arts Council Photo Gallery, $30. Class will dive into the basics of drawing and painting, focusing on perspective, color, and composition using pencil, pen, acrylic paint, and watercolors. A great class for students of all skill levels.

﹛﹛Special Friends Line Dance Class, Tuesdays, 11 a.m., Andy Griffith Museum Theatre, free. Shelby Coleman leads this class for Special Friends to have fun and move.

﹛﹛Clogging Classes, Tuesdays, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Andy Griffith Museum Theatre. Rhythmic Expression offers a variety of styles for all ages. Visit https://www.rhythmicexpressionclogging.com for additional information.

﹛﹛Free TAPS (Traditional Arts Programs) Youth Flatfoot Dance Lessons, Thursdays, 4:30-5 p.m. Historic Earle Theatre Learn this fun, percussive traditional dance. This program is sponsored in part by a TAPS grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛Free TAPS (Traditional Arts Programs) Youth Music Lessons, Thursdays, 5:30-6:15 p.m. fiddle; 6:15-6:45 p.m., guitar, banjo, and mandolin; Historic Earle Theatre. Award-winning musician and instructor Jim Vipperman teaches and instruments are provided. Come learn fiddle, mandolin, guitar or banjo! This program is sponsored in part by a TAPS grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛Free Jam Session, Thursdays, 7 p.m., Historic Earle Theatre. Local and visiting musicians are welcome. Music ranges from bluegrass and old-time to gospel and country. Musicians take turns playing, singing, and backing up others. Many come just to sit and listen or dance. This program is supported in part by a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

﹛﹛Tickets Now on Sale For#

﹛﹛Rhonda Vincent and the Rage, Saturday, March 21, 7:30 p.m. Historic Earle Theatre, $35-$55. One of the most awarded bands in bluegrass history, Rhonda Vincent and the Rage have won a Grammy and 19 IBMA awards (including Entertainer of the Year as well as Female Vocalist of the Year) among many others.

﹛﹛***

﹛﹛For additional information or to purchase tickets or register for classes, contact the Surry Arts Council at (336) 786-7998 or visit the website at www.surryarts.org. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/surryartscouncil/.

﹛﹛For additional information or to purchase tickets or register for classes, contact the Surry Arts Council at 336-786-7998 or visit the website at www.surryarts.org. Follow on Facebook at www.facebook.com/surryartscouncil/.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_venues-1-1.jpg

﹛﹛Earls of Leicester to perform Saturday

﹛﹛February 13, 2020

﹛﹛The Earls of Leicester presented by Jerry Douglas will return to the Historic Earle Theatre on Saturday for a concert beginning at 7:30 pm.

﹛﹛When the Earls of Leicester formed in 2013, their mission was ambitious but exact: To preserve and promote the legacy of bluegrass legends Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs in hopes of reviving the duo*s music for longtime admirers and introducing a new generation to their genre-defining sound.

﹛﹛Within a year of releasing their self-titled debut in 2014, they far surpassed all their expectations, winning a Grammy Award from Best Bluegrass Album and earning six awards from the International Bluegrass Music Association: Entertainer of the Year, Male Vocalist of the Year, Instrumental Group of the Year, Album of the Year, Gospel Recorded Performance of the Year, and Dobro Player of the Year.

﹛﹛Douglas points out that the most crucial factor in forming the Earls of Leicester was replicating the lightning-in-a-bottle chemistry that long fueled Flatt and Scruggs.

﹛﹛※I looked for years to find the group I needed for the alchemy to work,§ he says. In the end, Douglas landed on the lineup of Shawn Camp, Jeff White, Charlie Cushman, Johnny Warren, and Barry Bales. The first time they played together, Douglas was astounded by their immediate synergy.

﹛﹛※I*d hoped it was going to be even half that good, and it ended up just taking my breath away.§

﹛﹛The band channels the spirit of Flatt and Scruggs while allowing each member*s distinct charm and singular musicality to shine through. The Earls of Leicester transport audiences to a much simpler era, fostering a connection to the past and a sense of promise for the future.

﹛﹛※This music conjures up my childhood 每 it drops me off into a kinder, gentler place, and I think it should do that for everybody,§ Douglas says. ※When people come to see us, we want them to forget about the outside world and all the stress or strife that goes along with it, and hopefully hold onto that feeling for a while even after the show*s over.§

﹛﹛Tickets are $40-$65 and can be purchased online at www.surryarts.org, via phone at 336-786-7998 or at the Surry Arts Council office at 218 Rockford Street. For additional information, contact Courtney Thompson at 336-786-7998 or courtney@surryarts.org.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛The Earls of Leicester presented by Jerry Douglas will return to the Historic Earle Theatre on Saturday for a concert beginning at 7:30 pm.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_EarlsofLeicester.jpgThe Earls of Leicester presented by Jerry Douglas will return to the Historic Earle Theatre on Saturday for a concert beginning at 7:30 pm.

﹛﹛&Almost, Maine* offers Valentine treat

﹛﹛February 09, 2020

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council will present the romantic comedy ※Almost, Maine§ at the Andy Griffith Playhouse on Friday, Feb. 14, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Feb. 16, at 3 pm.

﹛﹛※As Valentine*s Day approaches, our minds inherently turn to love,§ said Madeline Matanick, director of the production. ※But we all think of love in different ways. This show celebrates love in all of its forms 每 the happy, the tearful and the wonderful.§

﹛﹛One cold, clear night in the middle of winter, while the northern lights hover in the sky above, the residents of Almost, Maine, find themselves falling in and out of love in the strangest ways. Love is lost, found, and confounded and the people of Almost, Maine will never be the same.

﹛﹛※It*s perfect for a Valentine*s date,§ Matanick said. ※Since the Friday night show starts at 8 p.m., you have time to go out to dinner, first, and then join us for an evening of love stories. Or, you could wrap-up a weekend of Valentine*s festivities with the Sunday afternoon performance at 3.§

﹛﹛As part of a new initiative for select shows, the Surry Arts Council is offering a limited number of complementary admissions. Patrons who have never attended a Surry Arts Players production may contact Courtney at 336-786-7998 to receive a complementary ticket. There are 25 complementary tickets available.

﹛﹛Tickets are $20 for preferred seating or $15 for orchestra seating and are available online at www.surryarts.org, via phone at 336-786-7998 or at the Surry Arts Council office at 218 Rockford St.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Jordan Dover, Susan Lawrence and Tyler Matanick rehearse a scene from ※Almost, Maine.§

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_AlmostMaine.JordanDoverSusanLawrenceTylerMatanick.jpgJordan Dover, Susan Lawrence and Tyler Matanick rehearse a scene from ※Almost, Maine.§

﹛﹛Photo Courtesy Hobart Jones

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Amanda Barnard and Paul Denny during one of the scenes in ※Almost, Maine.§

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_AlmostMaine.AshleyMillsTomMcCluskey.jpgAmanda Barnard and Paul Denny during one of the scenes in ※Almost, Maine.§

﹛﹛Photo Courtesy Hobart Jones

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Ashley Mills and Tom McCluskey during a rehearsal for ※Almost, Maine.§

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_AlmostMaine.AmandaBarnardandPaulDenny.jpgAshley Mills and Tom McCluskey during a rehearsal for ※Almost, Maine.§

﹛﹛Photo Courtesy Hobart Jones

﹛﹛Staff Report

﹛﹛Arts council holds fund drive kickoff

﹛﹛February 08, 2020

﹛﹛Staff, board members, and other supports of The Surry Arts Council gathered Thursday for some singing, a bit of fun, but most of all to kick off the organization*s annual fund drive.

﹛﹛Brian Royster, president of the Surry Arts Council Board of Directors welcomed guests, then Will Sheppard, co-chairman of the 2020 campaign, stressed the importance of the fund drive to ensure that the arts remain an important part of the community.

﹛﹛He shared a letter from Maddie Youell that will be enclosed with the fund drive packets, explaining why the arts are important to her, as part of Thursday*s event. The gathering is the official kick off the effort, with a goal to raise $170,000 for the Surry Arts Council*s operating budget of more than $1.4 million dollars.

﹛﹛Nicole Harrison, fund drive co-chairman, followed Sheppard with an overview of the past and current year. She shared a favorite quote: ※Before you walk, you dance; Before you speak, you sing; and Before you write, you draw.§

﹛﹛She noted that the arts council has been a part of her life as long as she can remember 每 starting with Arts Alive and Missoula. She shared the new 2020 brochure that has just arrived. Harrison pointed out that the Surry Arts Council dance program has more than 100 dancers enrolled who attend weekly classes, and she noted that the new Mount Airy Ukulele Festival had a goal of 100 attendees and ended with 102.

﹛﹛She pointed out that the Andy Griffith Museum continues to thrive and that attendance is more than 7,000 visitors ahead of prior year-to-date attendance. She announced that the council is kicking off the campaign with more than $70,000 raised to date.

﹛﹛The quality of life and economic impact of the arts was emphasized. Executive Director Tanya Jones then thanked board members and introduced staff members who were present.

﹛﹛Both before and after the kickoff, Madeline Matanick, Shelby Coleman, Ken White, and Courtney Thompson welcomed guests and discussed ongoing and upcoming programming. Heather Elliott and Abigail Linville offered museum and exhibit tours following the kickoff. Following the presentation, guests gathered in the lobby to discuss programming and pick up copies of the new brochure.

﹛﹛A photo presentation highlighting the past year ran continuously during the kick-off. Recent and upcoming programs announced included the Arts Ball which will be held on Feb. 21, and the Mount Airy Old-Time Retreat and Tommy Jarrell Festival that will be held Feb. 27-29.

﹛﹛Courtney Thompson encouraged attendees to spread the word about ongoing movies at the Historic Earle Theatre and distributed flyers on upcoming February movies and events. The monthly free movie for February is ※Wonder§ and will be shown to more than 400 students in the morning and will be open to the public free of charge at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 19.

﹛﹛The Earls of Leicester presented by Jerry Douglas will be in concert at the Earle on Feb. 15 with Rhonda Vincent returning on March 21, and The Isaacs on April 25. The Surry Arts Players romantic comedy, ※Almost, Maine,§ will open at 8 p.m. on Valentine*s Day. For information on a promotion for folks who have never attended community theater, contact madi@surryarts.org or call her at 336-786-7998.

﹛﹛The Surry Arts Council oversees programs at the Andy Griffith Playhouse, the Historic Earle Theatre and Old-Time Music Heritage Hall, the Andy Griffith Museum, the Andy Griffith Museum Theatre, and the Blackmon Amphitheatre. Free community programs are held weekly at arts council venues. More than 2,500 are reached each week by Surry Arts Council programs.

﹛﹛Everyone is invited to be a part of the arts in our community. Membership and program information is online www.surryarts.org or may be obtained by calling 336-786-7998 or emailing courtney@surryarts.org. Contributions can be mailed directly to the Surry Arts Council, P.O. Box 141, Mount Airy, NC 27030 or online.

﹛﹛During Thursday*s fundraising event, the Surry Arts Council*s community ambassadors, the Golden Notes, entertained and encouraged the guests to sing along. Sylvia Lowry directs the group and accompanied on piano. The Surry Arts Council staff and volunteers served the lunch that was donated by Subway.

﹛﹛Volunteers each took brochures and information with the goal of getting new members. Those present included Surry Arts Council Board members both past and present, spouses of board members, the Golden Notes, members of basket makers and the quilting clubs that meet at the arts council, volunteers involved in community theatre and line dance, staff, arts ball committee members, and other members and supporters.

﹛﹛

﹛﹛2020 Fund Drive co-chairman Will Sheppard shares fund drive information.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_SAC-Fund-Drive-2002-6035.jpg2020 Fund Drive co-chairman Will Sheppard shares fund drive information.

﹛﹛Photo Courtesy Hobart Jones

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Surry Arts Council board members and staff sing along with The Golden Notes.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_SAC-Fund-Drive-2002-5979.jpgSurry Arts Council board members and staff sing along with The Golden Notes.

﹛﹛Photo Courtesy Hobart Jones

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Brian Royster, president of the Surry Arts Council board of directors, welcomes Fund Drive Kickoff guests

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_SAC-Fund-Drive-2002-0044.jpgBrian Royster, president of the Surry Arts Council board of directors, welcomes Fund Drive Kickoff guests

﹛﹛Photo Courtesy Hobart Jones

﹛﹛

﹛﹛Surry Arts Council board members enjoy a Subway lunch following kickoff.

﹛﹛https://www.mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_SAC-Fund-Drive-2002-0062.jpgSurry Arts Council board members enjoy a Subway lunch following kickoff.

﹛﹛Photo Courtesy Hobart Jones

﹛﹛Staff Report

﹛﹛February 04, 2020

﹛﹛The Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County is seeking application for their Regional Artist Project Grants which offer support to artists in a six-county region that includes Surry, Stokes, Yadkin, Davie, Davidson, and Forsyth.

﹛﹛The grants help artists further their professional development. Committed, gifted individual artists and collaborative groups are eligible to apply.

﹛﹛※We are looking for opportunities to make grants that support the careers of area artists at pivotal points in their professional lives. These grants always are diverse because the needs and disciplines of individual artists vary dramatically,§ said Jordan Medley, manager of grants and support services for The Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County.

﹛﹛Guidelines, applications, and information sessions are available online at www.intothearts.org/regional-artist-project. Applications can also be obtained by stopping by the Surry Arts Council office at 218 Rockford Street in Mount Airy. Surry Arts Council staff are also available to assist with applications. Contact Heather Elliott at 336-786-7998 or heather@surryarts.org. Applications are due on Sunday, March 1, by 11:50 pm.

﹛﹛The grants are supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. Last year, The Arts Council made a total of $24,500 in awards in this grant category to 12 individual artists, collaborations, or music groups.

﹛﹛For additional information, contact Jordan Medley, manager of grants and support services at 336-546-6195 or jmedley@intothearts.org.

Key words:

about Us join us Advertising Services Sitemap

All Rights Reserved, Copyright  M one